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Typewriters have been replaced by high tech printers

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April 23, 2017: Are you familiar with the rhythmic tap sound produced by the typewriter? Isn’t it beautiful? I think the whole concept of a typewriter is magical. What I am trying to say is that, when words are typed on the machine, it produces a smooth, rhythmic sound. And that’s not the only beautiful output. Whatever one types, it is instantly breathed onto the paper and that I think, is the most fascinating and content feeling for any writer. But, by the end of the 1980s, the majestic typewriters became the middle child of the writing family, as the newborn technologies of computers and printers grabbed everyone’s attention. The onset of the computer era still was not a complete threat to the typewriters.

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But with the invention of printers, the typewriters suffered a huge setback. What were the reasons to accept the hi-tech printers and let go of the typewriters? Were the typewriters actually a better option than the new technologies? No, and yes. Just like there are two sides to a coin, there are two differing opinions for this too. David Mitchell, a British comedian-writer quote that, “For most digital-age writers, writing is rewriting. We grope, cut, block, paste, and twitch, panning for gold onscreen by deleting bucket loads of crap. Our analogue ancestors had to polish every line mentally before hammering it out mechanically. Rewrites cost them months, meters of the ink ribbon, and pints of Tippex. Poor sods.” What Mitchell says is true. People using typewriters did not have the privilege of the now not very highly acclaimed of, the backspace button.

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They had to filter a word or sentence hundred times before typing it out or else one wrong word or letter could cost them a whole sheet. Typewriters were therefore very vexatious. They also involved many resources which cost a lot. Ink ribbons, papers etc cost the writers a lot who did not have a surplus income. Rewriting or retyping also took a lot of time which delayed the production of work which is not the case with the new hi-tech technologies. Working with the new technologies is a hundred times easier than working with typewriters. You can have second thoughts about your writing and you can easily rewrite it by simply going on the saved draft on your desktop. Printers are very efficient. They can easily be connected to any digital device and you will get your prints. The printers are easy to maintain too. But are the hi-tech printers better than the typewriters on all fronts? James M. Cain, an American author and Journalist quotes that, “The academics don’t know that the only thing you can do for someone who wants to write is to buy him a typewriter.” Maybe what Cain is saying, is right on some notes.

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If a writer uses a typewriter, he would become more confident of what he thinks and writes. There wouldn’t be any fear of the work getting deleted by any software related issue. Whatever would be there, it would be in front of one’s eye without any digital barrier blocking the view. Also, as mentioned before, typewriters provide one with an instant piece of their work. So, the other side of the coin shines too. The technological takeover does not define one’s work though, especially writers’. It just shows that we are ready and welcome to all the changes.

– by Staff Writer of NewsGram 

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Most of 2030’s Jobs Haven’t Been Invented Yet

In theory, this kind of online job matching could lead to less bias and discrimination in hiring practices. However, there are potential pitfalls.

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JOBS
In theory, this kind of online job matching could lead to less bias and discrimination in hiring practices. However, there are potential pitfalls.

More than two-thirds of jobs that today’s college students will have in 11 years haven’t been invented yet.

“Those who plan to work for the next 50 years, they have to have a mindset of like, ‘I’m going to be working and learning and working and learning, and working and learning,’ in order to make a career,” says Rachel Maguire, a research director with the Institute for the Future, which forecasts that 85 percent of the jobs that today’s young people will hold in 2030 don’t exist right now.

The Institute for the Future, a nonprofit that identities emerging trends and their impacts on global society, envisions that by 2030, we’ll be living in a world where artificial assistants help us with almost every task, not unlike the way email tries to finish spelling a word for users today.

Maguire says it will be like having an assistant working alongside you, taking on tasks at which the human brain does not excel.

“For the human, for the people who are digitally literate who are able to take advantage, they’ll be well-positioned to elevate their position, elevate the kind of work they can do, because they’ve got essentially an orchestra of digital technologies that they’re conducting,” she says. “They’re just playing the role of a conductor, but the work’s being done, at least in partnership, with these machines.”

New technology in the next decade is expected to lead to new human-machine partnerships that will make the most of each partner's respective strengths.
New technology in the next decade is expected to lead to new human-machine partnerships that will make the most of each partner’s respective strengths. VOA

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says today’s students will have eight to 10 jobs by the time they are 38.

And they won’t necessarily have to take time away from any one of those jobs for workforce training or to gain additional certifications related to their fields. Instead, they’ll partner with machines for on-the-job learning, wearing an augmented reality headset that will give them the information they need in real-time to get the work done.

“It eliminates the need for people to step away from income generating opportunities to recertify in order to learn a new skill so they can level up and earn more money,” Maguire says. “It gives the opportunity for people to be able to learn those kinds of new skills and demonstrate proficiency in-the-moment at the job.”

Students use virtual reality for an immersive educational experience. VR blocks out the physical world and transports the user to a simulated world. (Courtesy Dell.com)
Students use virtual reality for an immersive educational experience. VR blocks out the physical world and transports the user to a simulated world. (Courtesy Dell.com) VOA

And forget about traditional human resources departments or the daunting task of looking for a job on your own. In the future, the job might come to you.

Potential employers will draw from different data sources, including online business profiles and social media streams, to get a sense of a person and their skill set.

Maquire says there’s already a lot of activity around turning employment into a matchmaking endeavor, using artificial intelligence and deep learning to help the right person and the right job find each other.

In theory, this kind of online job matching could lead to less bias and discrimination in hiring practices. However, there are potential pitfalls.

“We have to be cognizant that the people who are building these tools aren’t informing these tools with their own biases, whether they’re intentional or not,” Maguire says. “These systems will only be as good as the data that feeds them.”

Also Read: Migrant Caravan Still Stuck in Mexico Shelter, Frustration Grows By Every Passing Day

Which leads Maguire to another point. While she doesn’t want to sound melodramatic or evangelical about emerging technologies, she believes it is critical for the public to get engaged now, rather than sitting back and letting technology happen to them.

“What do we want from these new technological capabilities, and how do we make sure we put in place the social policies and the social systems that will result in what it is we all want?” she says. “I have a deep concern that we’re just kind of sitting back and letting technology tell us what jobs we’ll have and what jobs we won’t have, rather than us figuring out how to apply these technologies to improve the human condition.” (VOA)