Thursday November 14, 2019

Probiotics Not Effective in Reducing Anxiety: Study

For anxiety, the number one thing is to seek professional treatment. That should be the first action

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Probiotics Not Effective in Reducing Anxiety: Study
Anxiety linked to kicking, yelling during sleep as well. Pixabay

If you are expecting eating yogurt, which is rich in probiotics, to reduce your anxiety, you might be wrong. While consuming probiotics may be good for your digestive system, it may not be effective in decreasing your anxiety levels, say researchers.

The study found evidence that probiotics found in yogurt and supplements can reduce anxiety in rodents, but not in humans.

“Probiotics did not significantly reduce symptoms of anxiety in humans,” said lead author Daniel J. Reis from University of Kansas.

However, the researchers said their findings should not close the door on probiotics as the micro-organisms in yogurts and other products that take up residence in our guts may be a potentially useful therapy for anxiety and other cognitive issues in the future.

“We’re in the early days of this research into probiotics. We’re not saying they do nothing, but we have a lot to figure out before we know if they can be used therapeutically,” Reis said.

Also Read: Bacteria in The Gut May Lead to Anxiety, Depression

“I’ve seen a lot of stories hyping probiotics as helpful for anxiety but I wouldn’t recommend using them to treat anxiety at this stage,” he added.

In the study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, the team reviewed data from 22 preclinical studies involving 743 animals and 14 clinical studies of 1,527 individuals.

The results from the subgroup analyses revealed a significant reduction only among diseased animals.

For people experiencing anxiety, Reis suggested reaching out for expert help.

“For anxiety, the number one thing is to seek professional treatment. That should be the first action. There are some good therapies out there that can help with various anxiety disorders,” he noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Anxiety Among Teenagers Leads To Harmful Drinking

Generalized anxiety disorder among teenagers can lead to harmful drinking

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Anxiety among teenagers is associated with harmful drinking. Pixabay

Researchers at the University of Bristol have found evidence of an association between generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 and harmful drinking three years later.

The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence strengthens the evidence for a relationship between anxiety and later alcohol use as the researchers accounted for other factors such as adolescent smoking and cannabis use, and parental anxiety and alcohol use.

“Helping adolescents to develop positive strategies for coping with anxiety, instead of drinking alcohol, may reduce the risk of future harmful drinking. However, we cannot determine if the relationship is causal, because we used an observational study design,” said Maddy Dyer.

Using questionnaire and clinical interview data from more than 2,000 participants, researchers found generalised anxiety disorder at age 18 was linked to frequent drinking, frequent bingeing, hazardous drinking, and harmful drinking at age 18.

Generalised anxiety disorder continued to be associated with harmful drinking at age 21.

Drinking to cope was also strongly associated with more harmful drinking, but it did not appear to influence associations between anxiety and alcohol use.

Harmful drinking was measured using a special test developed by the World Health Association.

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Adolescents with anxiety drink at more harmful levels regardless of whether they tended to drink alcohol for coping reasons or not. Pixabay

On average, adolescents with anxiety drank at more harmful levels regardless of whether they tended to drink alcohol for coping reasons or not.

“Our own research has shown that links between mental health problems, such as anxiety disorders, and alcohol are common and complex,” said Mark Leyshon, Senior Policy and Research Manager at Alcohol Change UK.

For example, anxiety can be both a result of stopping drinking and a risk factor in beginning to drink too much, as this new study suggests.

Also Read- Study Says, Multitasking can take Teenagers to both Positive and Negative Approach

“We need more research to help us better understand the connections between alcohol and mental health, as well as high-quality, accessible, integrated support for substance misuse and mental health issues,” Leyshon added. (IANS)