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Problems Growing For Korean Air Chief Cho Yang-ho

Cho denied the accusations during an interrogation on Wednesday, in which she said "she only pushed him when he failed to properly answer her question", a police official said.

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South Korean police on Friday sought an arrest warrant against the younger daughter of the president of Korean Air for allegedly assaulting an advertising agency executive in April.
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South Korean police on Friday sought an arrest warrant against the younger daughter of the president of Korean Air for allegedly assaulting an advertising agency executive in April.

Cho Hyun-min, 35, a former senior executive of Korean Air and daughter of its chief Cho Yang-ho, allegedly flew into a rage during a meeting in April and threw a glass at an advertising agency official and juice at several other participants, according to a report in Yonhap news agency.

Cho denied the accusations during an interrogation on Wednesday, in which she said “she only pushed him when he failed to properly answer her question”, a police official said.

Korean Air chief Cho Yang-ho recently offered a public apology and removed his two daughters from all their company posts.
Cho Yang ho, Korean Air Chief

The incident involving one of most prominent business families of South Korea has stirred up a huge controversy in the country and reopened the debate over the excessive power wielded by families who own the “chaebol” — huge South Korean conglomerates.

Cho Hyun-min’s elder sister and former Vice President of the group, Cho Hyun-ah, was sentenced to two years in prison for a notorious “nut rage” incident in 2014 during which she became enraged when a first-class flight attendant served her macadamia nuts in a bag instead of on a dish. The plane was forced to return to the gate at New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport

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Korean Air chief Cho Yang-ho recently offered a public apology and removed his two daughters from all their company posts.

Prosecutors also accused Cho Hyun-min of smuggling in luxury goods into the country. Hundreds of employees of the airlines had convened a protest in central Seoul on Friday demanding that Cho Yang-ho step down as president. (IANS)

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In India, the Popularity of Korean Language is Increasing Day by Day

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Korean language. Representational image. Pixabay

December 21, 2016: A growing number of people in India are studying Korean to help themselves find jobs or pursue further studies in the East Asian country, officials said Monday.

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According to the Korean Cultural Center in New Delhi, an average of 203 students signed up for Korean language classes at its King Sejong Institute during every semester of this year.

When the classes first opened in 2013, there were an average of 55 students per semester.
The institute, a state-run organisation that teaches Korean overseas, has also opened new branches in Chennai and Patna, bringing their total number to three.

“In New Delhi and the surrounding capital area, as well as in the northeast where the influence of ‘hallyu’ is strong, more and more universities are opening courses in Korean and there is a growing trend toward studying the language across the country,” said Kim Geum-pyeong, the center chief, referring to the global popularity of Korean pop culture.

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“I think this is due not only to cultural factors, such as the spread of K-pop and hallyu, but also Korean businesses’ interest in the Indian market, which has fed increased demand for Korean in terms of jobs and practical reasons.”

In a study recently conducted by the New Delhi branch, 37 percent of Indians studying Korean said they hope to use it to find a job, while 33 percent said they hope to study further in South Korea. The other respondents said they were motivated by an interest in Korean culture.

In the past two years, 18 people who studied at the New Delhi institute were hired by South Korean companies such as Samsung Electronics, E Land and Oracle, as well as by Indian travel agencies. Eleven others went on to study Korean at an Indian university or received Korean government scholarships to study in South Korea.

Indian universities have also expanded their courses in Korean.

Last year, Banaras Hindu University, which is located in the northeastern city of Varanasi, opened a class in the language, raising the number of Indian universities teaching Korean to 19.

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In March, New Delhi’s Indira Gandhi National Open University, which runs courses for 3 million students via TV broadcasts, is set to launch a course in Korean and Korea studies.

-prepared by NewsGram team