Tuesday January 22, 2019
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Problems Growing For Korean Air Chief Cho Yang-ho

Cho denied the accusations during an interrogation on Wednesday, in which she said "she only pushed him when he failed to properly answer her question", a police official said.

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South Korean police on Friday sought an arrest warrant against the younger daughter of the president of Korean Air for allegedly assaulting an advertising agency executive in April.
Flag of South Korea, Pixabay

South Korean police on Friday sought an arrest warrant against the younger daughter of the president of Korean Air for allegedly assaulting an advertising agency executive in April.

Cho Hyun-min, 35, a former senior executive of Korean Air and daughter of its chief Cho Yang-ho, allegedly flew into a rage during a meeting in April and threw a glass at an advertising agency official and juice at several other participants, according to a report in Yonhap news agency.

Cho denied the accusations during an interrogation on Wednesday, in which she said “she only pushed him when he failed to properly answer her question”, a police official said.

Korean Air chief Cho Yang-ho recently offered a public apology and removed his two daughters from all their company posts.
Cho Yang ho, Korean Air Chief

The incident involving one of most prominent business families of South Korea has stirred up a huge controversy in the country and reopened the debate over the excessive power wielded by families who own the “chaebol” — huge South Korean conglomerates.

Cho Hyun-min’s elder sister and former Vice President of the group, Cho Hyun-ah, was sentenced to two years in prison for a notorious “nut rage” incident in 2014 during which she became enraged when a first-class flight attendant served her macadamia nuts in a bag instead of on a dish. The plane was forced to return to the gate at New York’s John F. Kennedy Airport

Also Read: Guantanamo Bay Could be the Place for Some Foreign Fighters

Korean Air chief Cho Yang-ho recently offered a public apology and removed his two daughters from all their company posts.

Prosecutors also accused Cho Hyun-min of smuggling in luxury goods into the country. Hundreds of employees of the airlines had convened a protest in central Seoul on Friday demanding that Cho Yang-ho step down as president. (IANS)

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Kim Jong Un Seeks More Inter-Korean Summits

Post-summit nuclear talks between Washington and Pyongyang quickly settled into a stalemate

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Kim Jong Un, Korean
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un meets with participants in the 4th National Meeting of Activists in Agricultural Field in Pyongyang, North Korea, in this undated picture released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency, Dec. 28, 2018. VOA

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sent a letter to South Korean President Moon Jae-in Sunday calling for more peace talks between the leaders in the new year following their active engagement in 2018, South Korea’s presidential office said.

Moon’s office said Kim also expressed regret that he couldn’t make a planned visit to Seoul, South Korea’s capital, by the end of December as pledged by the leaders during their last summit in September in Pyongyang, the North Korean capital.

The Blue House didn’t fully disclose Kim’s letter.

Korean
South Korean President Moon Jae-in makes a toast with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a luncheon at Samjiyon Guesthouse in Ryanggang province, North Korea. VOA

‘Difficulties ahead’

Moon later thanked Kim for his “warm” letter in a tweeted message and said without elaborating that Kim expressed strong willingness to carry out the agreements he made this year during a series of inter-Korean summits and a historic June meeting with President Donald Trump.

“There will still be a lot of difficulties ahead,” Moon said in his message. “However, our hearts will become more open if we put in that much effort. There’s no change in our heart about welcoming Chairman Kim (to the South).”

The tweet also included a photo that showed a ruby-colored folder emblazoned with the seal of Pyongyang’s powerful State Affairs Commission and the top part of Kim’s letter, which started with: “Dear your excellency President Moon Jae-in. Our meeting in Pyongyang feels like yesterday but about 100 days have already passed and now we are at the close of an unforgettable 2018.”

Korea
North Korean army soldiers are greeted by South Korean army soldiers, wearing helmets, as they cross the Military Demarcation Line inside the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) to inspect the dismantled South Korean guard post in Cheorwon. VOA

Summits, goodwill gestures

Through three summits between Moon and Kim this year, the Koreas agreed to a variety of goodwill gestures and vowed to resume economic cooperation when possible, voicing optimism that international sanctions could end to allow such activity.

The rivals have also taken steps to reduce their conventional military threat, such as removing mines and firearms from the border village of Panmunjom, destroying some front-line guard posts and creating buffer zones along their land and sea boundaries and a no-fly zone above the border.

“Chairman Kim said that the leaders by meeting three times in a single year and implementing bold measures to overcome the long period of conflict lifted our (Korean) nation from military tension and war fears,” Kim Eui-kyeom, Moon’s spokesman, said in a televised briefing.

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FILE – North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in inside the Peace House at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, South Korea, April 27, 2018.

“Chairman Kim said he will keep a close eye on the situation and expressed strong will to visit Seoul. … Chairman Kim also expressed his intentions to meet President Moon frequently again in 2019 to advance discussions on the Korean Peninsula’s peace and prosperity and discuss issues on the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula,” the spokesman said.

Moon’s office did not reveal how Kim Jong Un’s letter was delivered or whether he made any comments about his planned second summit with Trump in 2019.

New Year’s address

The letter comes days before Kim is expected to address North Koreans in a New Year’s speech that North Korean leaders traditionally use to announce major policy decisions and goals.

Kim used his New Year’s speech a year ago to initiate diplomacy with Seoul and Washington, which led to his meetings with Moon and a historic June summit with Trump. In his meetings with Moon and Trump, Kim signed on to vague statements calling for a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula without describing when or how it would occur.

Also Read: North Korea Refuses To Denuclearize Until U.S. Removes Its Nuclear Threat

Post-summit nuclear talks between Washington and Pyongyang quickly settled into a stalemate as the countries struggled between the sequencing of the North’s disarmament and the removal of U.S.-led international sanctions against the North. There continue to be doubts about whether Kim will ever voluntarily relinquish his nukes, which he may see as his strongest guarantee of survival.

Kim and Trump are trying to arrange a second summit in early 2019. (VOA)