Sunday November 17, 2019

30% Professionals Suffer From Mental Disorders

About 30% working population suffers from mental risks, says research

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Mental risks
One in every four person feels their work is not balanced and these people may suffer from mental risks. Pixabay

Thirty per cent working professionals suffer some form of mental, emotional risks and as much as 28 per cent some form of depression, a new survey conducted by health-tech startup Vivant revealed on Friday.

According to the research, one in every four person feels their work life balance is not good and 27 per cent people talk about high job stress.

The survey was conducted to gauge the state of mental health and spread awareness on depression, anxiety and stress among the millennial workforce.

Mental health
The survey highlighted that about 30% of the working folks suffer from mental and emotional risks. Pixabay

“Vivant endorses the preventive-care lifestyle and aims at eradicating the taboo around mental health. Preventive health is no longer viewed with scepticism, but, as a genuine approach towards ensuring wellness,” said Adrit Raha, CEO, Vivant.

Over two lakh platform users participated in the survey and it was derived that — 48 per cent of the participants maintain a sedentary lifestyle and 25 per cent people do not follow proper dietary habits.

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It was also highlighted that 23 per cent people face the risk of diabetes, whereas 30 per cent working professionals face some form of mental and emotional risks. (IANS)

Next Story

Young People Diagnosed with Diabetes May Experience High Stress Levels

In the study, the team evaluated 207 patients who were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the past two years

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Stress
Diabetes care is difficult, because it requires a lifestyle change that you have to do forever, Otherwise it leads to Stress. Pixabay

Young people diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes experience high psychological distress, resulting in worse health outcomes causing High Stress Levels and poor blood sugar control, find researchers from Carnegie Mellon University.

Age plays a critical role in the well-being of people newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

“We found we can evaluate a patient’s initial stress and predict how they will be doing six months later,” said Vicki Helgeson, professor of psychology at the university.

“If you can identify people who are facing diabetes distress earlier, you can intervene and prevent their health from declining,” said the findings published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

In the study, the team evaluated 207 patients who were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within the past two years.

They found younger patients (42 years and younger) experienced higher diabetes-related and psychological distress.

In addition, patients with higher education and income expressed more stress.

Conversely, older patients (older than 64 years) had less psychological stress and greater consistency in self-care, blood sugar control and medication adherence.

Stress
Young people diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes experience high psychological distress, resulting in worse health outcomes causing High Stress Levels and poor blood sugar control, find researchers from Carnegie Mellon University. Pixabay

Patients in long-term relationships also reported less diabetes stress.

Patients identified diet as the greatest stressor (38 per cent).

Other significant stressors include checking blood sugar (8 per cent) and experiencing high or low blood sugar events (7 per cent).

Patients who self-reported greater stress also reported greater depressed mood, less adherence to medication and higher anxiety.

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“Diabetes care is difficult, because it requires a lifestyle change that you have to do forever,” Helgeson said. “Life gets in the way of sticking to a diabetes regimen.” (IANS)