Thursday January 17, 2019

Progression of Parkinson disease could be slowed with exercise

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Progression of Parkinson disease could be slowed with exercise
Progression of Parkinson disease could be slowed with exercise. wikimedia commons

New York, Dec 23, 2017: Exercise can stop accumulation of a harmful protein which is believed to play a central role in the brain cell death associated with Parkinson’s disease, new research has found.

Engaging in exercise on a running wheel can stop the accumulation of the neuronal protein alpha-synuclein in brain cells, showed the study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Parkinson’s disease causes progressive loss of muscle control, trembling, stiffness, slowness and impaired balance.

“Our experiments show that exercise can get to the heart of the problem in Parkinson’s disease,” said one of the researchers Curt Freed, Professor at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in the US.

“People with Parkinson’s who exercise are likely able to keep their brain cells from dying,” Freed added.

The experiment was conducted in a mouse model of Parkinson’s, and the mice in the study, like humans, started to get Parkinson’s symptoms in mid-life. At 12 months of age, running wheels were put in their cages.

The researcehrs found that in the running mice, exercise increased brain and muscle expression of a key protective gene called DJ-1, compared to control transgenic animals which had locked running wheels.

Those rare humans born with a mutation in their DJ-1 gene are guaranteed to get severe Parkinson’s at a relatively young age.

The researchers tested mice that were missing the DJ-1 gene and discovered that their ability to run had severely declined, suggesting that the DJ-1 protein is required for normal movement.

“Our results indicate that exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease by turning on the protective gene DJ-1 and thereby preventing abnormal protein accumulation in brain,” Freed said.

He explained that his animal experiments had very real implications for humans.

Parkinson’s is a disease caused by the death of brain cells that make a critical chemical called dopamine. Without dopamine, voluntary movement is impossible. (IANS)

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Exercising May Improve Cognitive Skills in Elders

Participants who exercised showed significant improvements in cognitive skills when compared to those who did not exercise

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Exercise, healthy diet may improve cognitive skills in elders. Pixabay

Just 35 minutes of walking or cycling three times a week along with a healthy diet may improve cognitive skills in older adults, a new study suggests.

The study, published in the journal Neurology, examined the effects of both exercise and diet on cognitive skills.

For the study, the team involved 160 persons with an average age of 65 and randomly assigned them to one of the four groups — aerobic exercise alone; DASH diet alone; both aerobic exercise and the DASH diet; or health education, which consisted of educational phone calls once every week or two.

The research team found those who exercised and consumed the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables, beans, nuts, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, and lean meats, had greater improvements compared to health education controls.

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Being physically active can also help prevent risk factors for stroke, like obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure. Pixabay

Participants who exercised showed significant improvements in cognitive skills when compared to those who did not exercise.

There was no improvement in participants who only consumed the DASH diet, although those who exercised and consumed the DASH diet had greater improvements compared to health education controls.

Also Read- Earthquake With 5.8 Magnitude Hits Tibet

“The results are encouraging because in just six months, by adding regular exercise to their lives, people who have cognitive impairments without dementia improved their ability to plan and complete certain cognitive tasks,” said co-author James A. Blumentha from Duke University Medical Center in Durham. (IANS)