Saturday March 23, 2019

Progression of Parkinson disease could be slowed with exercise

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Progression of Parkinson disease could be slowed with exercise
Progression of Parkinson disease could be slowed with exercise. wikimedia commons

New York, Dec 23, 2017: Exercise can stop accumulation of a harmful protein which is believed to play a central role in the brain cell death associated with Parkinson’s disease, new research has found.

Engaging in exercise on a running wheel can stop the accumulation of the neuronal protein alpha-synuclein in brain cells, showed the study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Parkinson’s disease causes progressive loss of muscle control, trembling, stiffness, slowness and impaired balance.

“Our experiments show that exercise can get to the heart of the problem in Parkinson’s disease,” said one of the researchers Curt Freed, Professor at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in the US.

“People with Parkinson’s who exercise are likely able to keep their brain cells from dying,” Freed added.

The experiment was conducted in a mouse model of Parkinson’s, and the mice in the study, like humans, started to get Parkinson’s symptoms in mid-life. At 12 months of age, running wheels were put in their cages.

The researcehrs found that in the running mice, exercise increased brain and muscle expression of a key protective gene called DJ-1, compared to control transgenic animals which had locked running wheels.

Those rare humans born with a mutation in their DJ-1 gene are guaranteed to get severe Parkinson’s at a relatively young age.

The researchers tested mice that were missing the DJ-1 gene and discovered that their ability to run had severely declined, suggesting that the DJ-1 protein is required for normal movement.

“Our results indicate that exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease by turning on the protective gene DJ-1 and thereby preventing abnormal protein accumulation in brain,” Freed said.

He explained that his animal experiments had very real implications for humans.

Parkinson’s is a disease caused by the death of brain cells that make a critical chemical called dopamine. Without dopamine, voluntary movement is impossible. (IANS)

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Exercise May Help You Counter Effects of Jet Lag

For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days

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Representational image.
representational image. Pixabay

Finding it hard to cope with jet lag, shift-based work? Doing some excercise can shift the human body clock and help you adjust to the shifted schedules, suggests new research.

The study, from the Arizona State University, showed that exercise can shift the human body clock with the direction and amount of this effect depending on the time of day or night in which people exercise.

Exercising at 7 a.m. or between 1 and 4 p.m. advanced the body clock to an earlier time, and exercising between 7 and 10 p.m. delayed the body clock to a later time.

Exercising between 1 and 4 a.m. and at 10 a.m., however, had little effect on the body clock, and the phase-shifting effects of exercise did not differ based on age or gender, the researchers explained.

“Exercise has been known to cause changes to our body clock. We were able to clearly show in this study when exercise delays the body clock and when it advances it,” said lead author Shawn Youngstedt, from the varsity.

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Exercise can help you counter effects of jet lag, shift-based work. Pixabay.

“This is the first study to compare exercise’s effects on the body clock, and could open up the possibility of using exercise to help counter the negative effects of jet lag and shift work.”

The findings, published in The Journal of Physiology, suggest exercise could counter the effects of jet lag, shift work, and other disruptions to the body’s internal clock (e.g., military deployments) helping individuals adjust to shifted schedules.

Also Read- Billion-Dollar Business Goes To The Dog Walkers

For the study, the team examined body clocks following exercise in 101 participants for up to five-and-a-half days.

The baseline timing of each participant’s body clock was determined from urine samples collected every 90 minutes to measure the time of the evening rise in melatonin and the peak of melatonin several hours later. (IANS)