Monday April 22, 2019

Prostrate Medicines Likely to Increase Risk of Type-2 Diabetes

For the study, the team studied health records from around 55,000 men who were prescribed 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors

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check-up for diabetes
Check-up for Diabetes. Pixabay

Medicines prescribed to reduce the symptoms of prostate diseases increase the likelihood of developing Type-2 diabetes.

A study found that the drugs increased the risk of developing the disorder by about 30 per cent. In addition, a similar effect was seen when repeated with health records from a group of Taiwanese men.

Men with enlarged prostates are commonly prescribed the drugs called 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors that reduce the production of hormones called androgens. These help treat symptoms such as reduced urinary flow.

The study’s findings suggested that men taking these medications may need additional health checks to monitor warning signs of diabetes so that their prescriptions can be altered if necessary.

Representational image.

“We found that commonly prescribed medications for prostate disease can increase the risk of Type-2 diabetes. These findings will be particularly important for health screening in older men who are already typically at a higher risk of Type-2 diabetes,” said Ruth Andrew, Professor at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

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“It is important that all patients are made aware of the risks and benefits of their medications,” noted Li Wei, Associate Professor at the UCL School of Pharmacy in Britain.

For the study, the team studied health records from around 55,000 men who were prescribed 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors. (IANS)

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Gut Bacteria Has The Ability To Contribute to Diabetes

"Our findings show clearly how important the interaction between gut microbiota and diet is to understand our metabolism in health and disease," said Backhed

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Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Gut bacteria has the ability to affect how cells respond to insulin and can thus contribute to Type-2 diabetes, says a new study.

The study explored that the gut microbiota of people with treatment-naive Type-2 diabetes can be linked to a different metabolism of the amino acid histidine, which is mainly derived from the diet.

This in turn leads to the formation of imidazole propionate, a substance that impairs the cells’ ability to respond to insulin. Therefore, reducing the amount of bacterial-produced imidazole propionate could be a new way of treating patients with such disease.

“This substance does not cause all Type-2 diabetes, but our working hypothesis is that there are sub-populations of patients who might benefit from changing their diet or altering their gut microbiota to reduce the levels of imidazole propionate,” said Fredrik Backhed, Professor at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Cell, the research team involved 649 participants.

They used fecal samples and found that the microbiota of people with Type-2 diabetes produced imidazole propionate when histidine was added. However, this mechanism was not found in the diabetes-free control subjects.

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“Our findings show clearly how important the interaction between gut microbiota and diet is to understand our metabolism in health and disease,” said Backhed.

The result also shows that gut bacteria from different individuals can lead to the production of completely different substances that may have very specific effects in the body,” he noted. (IANS)