Monday September 23, 2019

Know Which Medication Can Help By Protecting You From Familial Breast Cancer

Earlier Austrian studies have given strong indications that Denosumab may be effective against breast cancer, experts said

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PTSD, Ovarian cancer, cancer, risk, women
Up to now the only preventative measure against both cancers has been surgical removal of the affected breast tissue or the ovaries. Pixabay

Breast cancer passed down in families may be preventable by the medication Denosumab, which is undergoing a five-year study in Austria.

The Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group is leading the work as it examines the drug’s effectiveness on 2,950 patients with a hereditary disposition to this particular form of cancer, according to an Austria Press Agency report.

Speaking at a press conference on Thursday, Professor Christian Singer from the Vienna General Hospital said the study will also examine the effects of Denosumab on healthy women who have a mutation in the BRCA1 gene, reports Xinhua news agency.

gene
enosumab is known as a monoclonal antibody and has been used in particular to treat osteoporosis, due to its capacity to prevent the development of cells that break down bone. Pixabay

These women have a 1.8 per cent chance of developing breast cancer each year, or about an 80 per cent chance during their lifetime. In addition, they have a 50 per cent chance of developing ovarian cancer.

Up to now the only preventative measure against both cancers has been surgical removal of the affected breast tissue or the ovaries.

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The Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group is leading the work as it examines the drug’s effectiveness on 2,950 patients with a hereditary disposition to this particular form of cancer, according to an Austria Press Agency report. Pixabay

The participants in the drug trial will receive either a Denosumab injection or a placebo every six months, Singer said.

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Denosumab is known as a monoclonal antibody and has been used in particular to treat osteoporosis, due to its capacity to prevent the development of cells that break down bone.

Earlier Austrian studies have given strong indications that Denosumab may be effective against breast cancer, experts said. (IANS)

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Walking, A Key Tool Identify The Specific Type of Dementia

Researchers have found that walking may be a key clinical tool in helping doctors accurately identify the specific type of dementia

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health, dementia, walking, Alzheimer
The suffering that comes as a consequence of this disease is enormous. Pixabay

Researchers have found that walking may be a key clinical tool in helping doctors accurately identify the specific type of dementia a patient has.

Published in the Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, the research have shown that people with Alzheimer’s disease or Lewy body dementia have unique walking patterns that signal subtle differences between the two conditions.

The study also shows that people with Lewy body dementia change their walking steps more – varying step time and length – and are asymmetric when they move, in comparison to those with Alzheimer’s disease.

“The results from this study are exciting as they suggest that walking could be a useful tool to add to the diagnostic toolbox for dementia,” said study lead author Riona McArdle from the Newcastle University in the UK.

“It is a key development as a more accurate diagnosis means that we know that people are getting the right treatment, care and management for the dementia they have,” she added.

For the study, researchers analysed the walk of 110 people, including 29 older adults whose cognition was intact, 36 with Alzheimer’s disease and 45 with Lewy body dementia.

health, dementia, walking, Alzheimer
Dementia is a rapidly growing public health problem throughout the world. VOA

Participants moved along a walkway – a mat with thousands of sensors inside – which captured their footsteps as they walked across it at their normal speed and this revealed their walking patterns.

People with Lewy body dementia had a unique walking pattern in that they changed how long it took to take a step or the length of their steps more frequently than someone with Alzheimer’s disease, whose walking patterns rarely changed.

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When a person has Lewy body dementia, their steps are more irregular and this is associated with increased falls risk.

Their walking is more asymmetric in step time and stride length, meaning their left and right footsteps look different to each other.

The study found that analysing both step length variability and step time asymmetry could accurately identify 60 per cent of all dementia subtypes – which has never been shown before. (IANS)