Tuesday July 16, 2019

Protective molecule against Alzheimer’s identified

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New York: Giving the search for Alzheimer’s therapies a shot in the arm, researchers have identified the steps that a molecule takes to protect the brain from toxic effects of protein fragments known as amyloid beta, a hallmark of the progressive brain disorder.

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“Our discovery centers on a protein called WAVE1, which we found to be important in the production of amyloid beta,” said study author Paul Greengard, professor at Rockefeller University in New York.

“The reduction of WAVE1 appears to have a protective effect against the disease,” Greengard noted.

Brain cells themselves make amyloid beta, and for reasons that are not fully understood, its accumulation ultimately contributes to the memory loss, personality changes, and other symptoms that patients with this degenerative disease often suffer from.

“When levels of amyloid beta rise, there is an accompanying increase in another molecule, AICD, which reduces the expression of WAVE1. This has the effect of reducing the production of amyloid beta,” Greengard explained.

“By targeting steps within this newly discovered pathway, it may be possible to develop drugs to reduce amyloid beta that potentially could be used to either treat or prevent Alzheimer’s disease,” Greengard pointed out.

WAVE1 is known to help to build filaments of a protein called actin that serve as basic components of cellular structures.

In the current study, the team, examined the levels of WAVE1 in mouse and cellular models of Alzheimer’s disease.

They found a dose-dependent response: Mice brains with low WAVE1 levels produced less amyloid-?, and these animals performed better on memory tests.

(IANS)

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Artificial Intelligence Can Prove to be a Boon for Patients with Alzheimer’s

The findings demonstrated the potential valid clinical utility of “MemTrax”, administered as part of the online test in screening for variations in cognitive brain health

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A lady suffering from Alzheimer's. Flickr

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can prove to be essential for healthcare providers to detect and manage Alzheimer’s disease or a related form of dementia, from which 44 million people suffer worldwide.

In the study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the team introduced supervised Machine Learning (ML) as a modern approach and new value-added complementary tool in cognitive brain health assessment and related patient care and management.

With the increasingly favourable instrument “MemTrax” — an online memory test using image recognition — the clinical efficacy of this new approach as a memory function screening tool has been sufficiently demonstrated.

For the study, a team of researchers including from the Florida Atlantic University, SIVOTEC Analytics and Stanford University employed a novel application of supervised ML and predictive modeling to demonstrate and validate the cross-sectional utility of “MemTrax” as a clinical decision support screening tool for assessing cognitive impairment.

"The question for us now is not how to eliminate cholesterol from the brain, but about how to control cholesterol's role in Alzheimer's disease through the regulation of its interaction with amyloid-beta," Vendruscolo said.
In Alzheimer’s disease, patients start losing memory. Pixabay

The findings demonstrated the potential valid clinical utility of “MemTrax”, administered as part of the online test in screening for variations in cognitive brain health.

“Findings from our study provide an important step in advancing the approach for clinically managing a very complex condition like Alzheimer’s disease,” said lead author Michael F. Bergeron, Senior Vice President, SIVOTEC Analytics.

Also Read: Facebook Develops VR Avatars with Real-time Interactivity

“By analysing a wide array of attributes across multiple domains of the human system and functional behaviours of brain health, informed and strategically directed advanced data mining, supervised Machine Learning, and robust analytics can be integral for healthcare providers to detect and anticipate further progression in this disease and myriad other aspects of cognitive impairment,” he explained. (IANS)