Friday April 10, 2020

Consume Protein From Dairy,Plant Sources and Not Red Meat: Researchers

Swapping red meat for plants lead to longer life

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Red meat
Researchers have found that eating more protein from plant sources or dairy while reducing red meat consumption could help people live longer. Pixabay

Want to live longer? Take a note. Health and lifestyle researchers have found that eating more protein from plant sources or dairy while reducing red meat consumption could help people live longer.

Higher percentage of calories from plant protein in the diet is tied to lower risk of death, the study said.

“Our findings suggest that even partial replacement of red meat with healthy, plant-based sources of protein could substantially reduce rates of coronary heart disease in the US,” said the study’s lead author Laila Al-Shaar from Harvard University. The study was presented in a meeting at the ‘American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention, Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2020’ in the US.

According to the researchers, in the study of more than 37,000 Americans with an average age of 50, those who ate the most plant protein were 27 per cent less likely to die of any cause and 29 per cent less likely to die of coronary heart disease, compared to people who ate the least amount of plant protein.

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Diet substitutions for red meat are linked to lower heart disease risk. Pixabay

Keeping the number of calories the participants ate consistent, the researchers were able to estimate the amount of plant protein compared to animal protein people in the study ate and compare it to the risk of dying.

They found that replacing 5 per cent of daily calories from total animal protein with the equivalent number of calories of plant protein was linked to a nearly 50 per cent decrease in the risk of dying of any cause including coronary heart disease.

The study also revealed that replacing two per cent of daily calories from processed meat protein with an equivalent number of calories from plant protein was associated with a 32 per cent lower risk of death. Diet substitutions for red meat linked to lower heart disease risk, it added.

According to the research, substituting one serving per day of red or processed red meat with foods, such as nuts, legumes, whole grains or dairy, was associated with up to a 47 per cent lower risk of having coronary heart disease in men.

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“It isn’t enough just to avoid red meat – it’s also about what you choose to eat in place of red meat. Healthy plant proteins like nuts, legumes and whole grains contain more than just protein – they include other beneficial nutrients such as healthy fats, antioxidant vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals (compounds derived from plants), which have been associated with lower risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers,” said researcher Zhilei Shan. (IANS)

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Vitamin-D Rich Food May Be Good For Your Heart Health

The research from Harokopio University was conducted during 2001-2012 and included 1,514 men and 1,528 women from the greater Athens area, in Greece  

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Vitamin-D
People who get too little vitamin D may develop soft, thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Pixabay

Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects.

Vitamin D is a nutrient found in some foods that is needed for health and to maintain strong bones. It does so by helping the body absorb calcium (one of bone’s main building blocks) from food and supplements.

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Some food items that are high in vitamin D are salmon fish, herring and sardines, cheese, cod liver oil, canned tuna, egg yolks, mushrooms and fortified foods. People who get too little vitamin D may develop soft, thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults.

The current study, published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, aimed to evaluate the association between dietary vitamin D intake and 10-year first fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD), conventional CVD risk factors and surrogate markers related to inflammation, coagulation, insulin resistance, liver and renal function.

The research from Harokopio University was conducted during 2001-2012 and included 1,514 men and 1,528 women from the greater Athens area, in Greece.

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Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects. Pixabay

Want to live longer with a healthy heart? Start consuming vitamin D-rich food as researchers have found that consuming foods high in vitamin D can have heart-protective effects. PixabayAccording to the researchers, dietary assessment was based on a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire.

Daily intake of vitamin D was calculated using a standardised food database.

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The research found that in the lowest, middle, and highest categories of vitamin D intake, cardiovascular events (such as heart attacks and strokes) occurred in 24 per cent, 17 per cent, and 12 per cent of men and 14 per cent, 10 per cent, and 11 per cent of women.

In contrast with vitamin D supplementation trials that have shown modest to neutral beneficial effects on heart health, this study revealed that increased vitamin D intake from food sources may protect against heart-related problems, especially in men. (IANS)