Tuesday June 25, 2019
Home India PUBG: Put an ...

PUBG: Put an End to the Addictive Game Before it Threatens Lives Of More Children

Three out of four Indian gamers play mobile games at least twice a day

0
//
Mobile gaming is now prevalent in tier-2 and tier-3 cities with similar amounts of time spent by the users. Pixabay

Call it the gravest level of gaming addiction, but three years back, two Delhi brothers – hooked to gaming consoles in such a way that they forgot to take meals, bathe or even take loo breaks – finally ended up in a rehabilitation facility.

Three years is a long time in the world of gaming, but in the world of technology, it has only got worse.

With smartphones getting cheaper and better, mobile gaming has taken off and millions of Indian youth are now hooked to games like PlayerUnknown Battleground (PUBG).

After playing PUBG for six straight hours, a 16-year-old student of class XII named Furqan Qureshi from Neemuch in Madhya Pradesh succumbed to a major cardiac arrest last week and lost his life – just as he lost a mission in the multi-player mobile game.

PUBG, Addictive, Game, Kills
With smartphones getting cheaper and better, mobile gaming has taken off and millions of Indian youth are now hooked to games like PlayerUnknown Battleground (PUBG). Pixabay

The cardiologist who treated him to the biological and mental after-effects of PUBG has now urged the government to put an end to the addictive game before it threatens lives of more children in India.

“He was a young boy with a healthy heart. He was a swimmer and had no history of heart issues. The rush of anxiety, anger and hormones triggered a deep shock situation that unfortunately blocked his heart,” Dr Ashok Jain, Cardiologist at Pukhratan hospital, Neemuch told IANS.

“He was brought without a pulse. We tried to revive him but we could not,” Jain added.

Developed by a South Korean company video game company Bluehole and launched in 2017, the “survival of the fittest” idea-based battle game was quick to gather a global gamer-base of 227 million but has been infamous for its addictive nature.

Also Read- US Border Patrol Agents will Deploy to Guatemala to Train Side-by-Side

With an in-game talking feature, PUBG connects strangers and friends from around the world in real-time to kill enemies and emerge as mission winners.

In October 2018, a 19-year-old Delhi boy was arrested for killing his parents and sister because they did not approve of his lifestyle that revolved around playing PUBG with his peers at a secretly rented room.

In May, a 19-year old Ahmedabad girl married with a year-old baby demanded divorce from her husband because of her immense indulgence in PUBG.

“I request parents as well as the government to take strict measures against such games. Not only are games like PUBG hindering the mental, emotional and physical development of teenagers but are also posing life threats now. Its shocking and alarming,” warned Jain.

PUBG, Addictive, Game, Kills
With an in-game talking feature, PUBG connects strangers and friends from around the world in real-time to kill enemies. Pixabay

Recent studies suggest that three out of four Indian gamers play mobile games at least twice a day, for an average of over 60 minutes each day. Mobile gaming is now prevalent in tier-2 and tier-3 cities with similar amounts of time spent by the users.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), people who partake in gaming should be alert to the amount of time they spend on gaming activities, as well as to any changes in their physical or psychological health and social functioning that could be attributed to their pattern of gaming behaviour.

Pointing out that it adversely affected child psyche and their studies, the Gujarat State Commission for Protection of Child Rights in January issued a letter to the state government seeking a ban on PUBG. The state also urged the Centre to initiate proceedings on banning the online game.

The game, which allegedly fuels aggressive behaviour in gamers and promotes violence, has been banned in Nepal and Iraq.

Also Read- OPPO A5s: Flashy Looks, Big Battery in Small Budget

Chinese tech giant Tencent, that holds shares in PUBG’s parent company, put an end to PUBG in China, replacing it with an anti-terrorist themed less violent game named “Heping Jingying” or “Game for Peace”.

However, there are some who do not want PUBG to be banned.

“I play PUBG everyday. What happened with Furqan has shocked us all. I do not want the game to be banned because it is a good stress buster but I would try my best to limit my playing hours,” said Prashant Sharma, a 20-year-old student from Pune. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s How You can Fight Your Digital Addiction

Vohra suggested that when parents realise that their child is spending too much time on screen, it is very important first to have a dialogue with the kid and ask them to cut down on media consumption

0
tiktok
TikTok has over 54 million monthly active users (MAUs) in India. Pixabay

Digital addiction is real and it could be as dangerous as drug addiction, warned psychiatrists while outlining practical ways to fight the urge to use gadgets non-stop both among children and adults.

The warning came following reports of a 24-year-old mother committing suicide last week in Tamil Nadu after she was prevented from using TikTok and a 16-year-old student from Madhya Pradesh suffering a major cardiac arrest and losing his life after playing PUBG for six straight hours last month.

The key to fighting digital addiction is to realise the problem when someone develops it, the experts said.

Parikh also recommended that adults should undergo a four hours of “digital detox” every week – a period when they do not use their phone or any gadget.

“If one finds it difficult to go through those four hours then there is a problem which needs to be addressed,” he said.

People who are addicted to using gadgets, tend to get “withdrawal symptoms” in the form of always thinking about that them, or becoming irritable with disturbed sleep when they try to stop using their devices, said Sandeep Vohra, Senior Consultant, Psychiatry, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi.

“Digital addiction is as bad as addiction to any other drug. So if you are hit by digital addiction, the signs are that you actually tend to go off your normal routine life. You are always dependent and on the screen,” Vohra told IANS.

Such people can neglect personal hygiene and their own self. They also tend to stop interacting with the society, with their family members and stop thinking about their responsibilities or stop doing their day-to-day chores.

pubg
Some players claimed to have received the reminder within an hour and a half of playing the game. Wikimedia Commons

“One can have clinical depression, anxiety, obsessive symptoms, insomnia, irritability, and difficulty in concentrating on other things.

“And you can have in rare cases, when one becomes over-dependent, psychosis. So you have to be aware of all this and it can be very challenging if you don’t realise that you are going into addiction,” Vohra added.

It is not just adults who are vulnerable to digital addiction as use of smartphones and other gaming devices have become common among children.

But do we know when a child starts showing signs of addiction and when to seek help?

The experts suggested that parents should be alarmed when they notice that a child’s ability to live life normally has got affected and they lash out badly when digital access is denied.

“Parents need to be good role models. If parents spend too much time on digital gadgets then children learn and follow by example. Encourage children to be social and develop hobbies,” Parikh said.

Also Read- CERN Ditching Microsoft as Licensing Costs Shoot up

“If you keep focusing your child’s attention on indoor activities there are higher chances of him/her becoming digitally addicted. Therefore encourage him/her to play sports or meet friends and family. Reading is also a great way to combat boredom if indoors,” he added.

Vohra suggested that when parents realise that their child is spending too much time on screen, it is very important first to have a dialogue with the kid and ask them to cut down on media consumption.

“If they feel that either the child is not responding the way they want, or if they feel that the child is trying to tell them lies and still using time on screen, then it’s better to consult a mental health professional,” Vohra informed. (IANS)