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Publishers Body Welcomes HC Order Lifting Non-NCERT Book Ban

"The ruling, in addition to providing convenience to children and parents, will also enable them to choose books depending on their preference,"

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Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay

The Association of Publishers in India (API) on Tuesday welcomed the Delhi High Court order which stipulated that sale of non-NCERT books must not be disallowed in CBSE-affiliated schools, calling the practice “discriminatory”.

“The court decision exemplifies the point that an ideal education system is the one that recognizes the role of multiple stakeholders and is learner-centric. The decision has been welcomed by not just students and parents but also by schools, private publishers, authors and others as it symbolizes ‘freedom of choice’ in education,” the representative body of publishers of academic texts said in a statement.

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“The ruling, in addition to providing convenience to children and parents, will also enable them to choose books depending on their preference,” it said.

NCERT
Arguing that the sale of books, stationery and other items sold by the school be treated as “essential requirements”, the court last week in a decision refused to put a ban on these activities. Pixabay

 

In doing so, the court overturned the April 2017 injunction issued by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE), which asked affiliating schools not to indulge in “commercial” activities.

ALSO READ: App allowing free download of all NCERT books to be launched soon

The court said the availability of uniforms, non-NCERT reference books or even food items for sale only to the students of the school does not fall in the category of and cannot at all be considered as commercialization.

Earlier in its circular, the board had asked the schools to “desist from the unhealthy practice of coercing parents to buy textbooks, notebooks, stationery, uniforms, shoes, school bags etc from within the premise or from selected vendors only” and directed them to operate as doing “community service” as per the board by-laws.

Minister of State for Human Resource Development Upendra Kushwaha, in December last year, told Parliament that CBSE has not directed students or schools to buy or prescribe NCERT books only. (IANS)

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Delhi High Court Directs Private Clinic to Continue with the Stem Cell Treatment

The clinic, which is administering the medicine, cannot function under the new rules until the licence is duly obtained

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Delhi High Court. Source- Wikimedia

In an interim relief, the Delhi High Court has directed a private clinic to continue with the stem cell treatment being provided to the patients till its further orders.

The court’s interim direction came while hearing various petitions challenging the Centre’s decision to put stem cell therapy in the category of new drugs.

The petitioners were being provided stem cell treatment in Nutech Mediworld Clinic in Green Park here.

A Division Bench of justices Anu Malhotra and Talwant Singh said that all details of treatment being provided to the petitioners by the clinic be placed on record with an affidavit.

Representational image.

The court has sought the response of Centre and Indian Council of Medical Research to file reply on the petition and listed the matter for September 4 for further hearing.

The court has directed authorities concerned to examine whether the products being administered to the petitioners, prima facie, fall within the scope of the expression ‘new drugs’ as defined under Rule 2(1) (w) of New Drugs and Clinical Trial Rules, 2019 and communicate the view to the petitioners and the said clinic.

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On account of the Centre’s fresh notification on ‘New Drugs and Clinical Rule 2019’, some medications used for the treatment would fall under the definition of ‘new drug’ and require approval from the authority concerned.

The clinic, which is administering the medicine, cannot function under the new rules until the licence is duly obtained. (IANS)