Monday August 26, 2019

Quarter of World’s Population at High Risk of Developing Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis, which is caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, affects more than 10 million people every year

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World, Population, Tuberculosis
The study, published in European Respiratory Journal, shows that one in four people in the world carries tuberculosis bacterium in the body. Pixabay

A quarter of the world’s population is at high risk of developing tuberculosis, reveals a new study.

The study, published in European Respiratory Journal, shows that one in four people in the world carries tuberculosis bacterium in the body.

Tuberculosis, which is caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, affects more than 10 million people every year and kills up to 2 million, making it the most deadly of the infectious diseases.

Besides, several people are infected with the tuberculosis bacterium without having active disease called latent tuberculosis.

World, Population, Tuberculosis
A quarter of the world’s population is at high risk of developing tuberculosis, reveals a new study. Pixabay

The study, which is based on tests from 351,811 individuals, emphasises that it will be extremely difficult to reach the WHO’s goal of eliminating tuberculosis by 2035.

“At any rate, the objective cannot be achieved without treating the large incidence of latent tuberculosis, since all infected people are at the risk of developing active tuberculosis disease later in life,” said Christian Wejse, Associate Professor at Aarhus University, Denmark.

For the study, researchers from Denmark and Sweden reviewed 88 scientific studies from 36 different countries to describe the occurrence of latent tuberculosis infection.

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The study indicates that somewhere between one-fifth and one-fourth of the population have latent tuberculosis. (IANS)

Next Story

New Vaccine for Tuberculosis Shows Promise

Two peptides (small proteins), which are normally found in tuberculosis bacteria, were synthesised and then bound extremely tightly to an adjuvant (a stimulant) that was able to kick-start the immune response in the lungs

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World, Population, Tuberculosis
The study, published in European Respiratory Journal, shows that one in four people in the world carries tuberculosis bacterium in the body. Pixabay

Researchers have successfully developed and tested a new type of vaccine targeting tuberculosis (TB).

Published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the early-stage vaccine was shown to provide substantial protection against TB in a pre-clinical laboratory setting.

“Tuberculosis is a huge world-wide health problem. It’s caused by a bacteria that infects the lungs after it’s inhaled, is contagious and results in approximately 1.6 million deaths per year globally,” said study co-author Anneliese Ashhurst, who is affiliated with both the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney.

The research programme targeting the deadly disease took over five years of effort to be implemented.

FILE – A tuberculosis patient receives treatment at a clinic in Jakarta, Indonesia. VOA

A team of scientists created the advanced synthetic TB vaccine and have now demonstrated its effectiveness using mouse models.

Two peptides (small proteins), which are normally found in tuberculosis bacteria, were synthesised and then bound extremely tightly to an adjuvant (a stimulant) that was able to kick-start the immune response in the lungs.

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“We were then able to show that when this vaccine was inhaled into the lungs, it stimulated the type of T cells known to protect against TB. Importantly, we then demonstrated that this type of vaccine could successfully protect against experimental airborne TB infection,” Ashhurst said.

“The important thing is that the vaccine actually gets to the lungs because that’s where you first see TB. Ultimately, we would love to see a form of this vaccine available for use in an easily inhaled nasal spray which would provide life-long TB protections,” said researcher Warwick Britton. (IANS)