Sunday December 16, 2018

Radiation From Smartphones May up Miscarriage Risk: Study

This study provides evidence from a human population that magnetic field non-ionising radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health

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Pregnant woman using smartphones
Pregnant woman using smartphone.
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Pregnant women’s exposure to non-ionising radiation from smartphones, Bluetooth devices and laptops may more than double the risk of miscarriage, a study has showed.

Non-ionising radiation — radiation that produces enough energy to move around atoms in a molecule, but not enough to remove electrons completely — from magnetic fields is produced when electric devices are in use and electricity is flowing.

It can be generated by a number of environmental sources, including electric appliances, power lines and transformers, wireless devices and wireless networks.

While the health hazards from ionising radiation are well-established and include radiation sickness, cancer and genetic damage, the evidence of health risks to humans from non-ionising radiation remains limited, said De-Kun Li, a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at the Kaiser Permanente — a US-based health care firm.

For the study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, the team asked for 913 pregnant women over age 18 to wear a small (a bit larger than a deck of cards) magnetic-field monitoring device for 24 hours.

Pregnant woman using smartphones
Representational image.

After controlling for multiple other factors, women who were exposed to higher magnetic fields levels had 2.72 times the risk of miscarriage than those with lower magnetic fields exposure.

The increased risk of miscarriage associated with high magnetic fields was consistently observed regardless of the sources of high magnetic fields. The association was much stronger if magnetic fields was measured on a typical day of participants’ pregnancies.

The finding also demonstrated that accurate measurement of magnetic field exposure is vital for examining magnetic field health effects.

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“This study provides evidence from a human population that magnetic field non-ionising radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health,” Li noted.

“We hope that the finding from this study will stimulate much-needed additional studies into the potential environmental hazards to human health, including the health of pregnant women,” he said. (Bollywood Country)

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800 Mn Smartphone Users In India By 2020: CISCO Study

The report added that India will be a major driver of this with the total number of Internet users reaching 840 million

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India currently has over 400 million smartphone users and over 700 million feature phone users. Image: Pixabay

The number of smartphone users is expected to double to 829 million by 2022 from 404.1 million in 2017, projects a new Cisco report.

This proliferation of smart devices will propel India’s per capita data consumption to nearly 14 gigabytes (GB) by 2022 from 2.4 GB in 2017, according to Cisco’s latest “Visual Networking Index (VNI)” report.

“By 2022, the smartphone data consumption will increase by five time in India — which proves the dominance of smartphones as the communications hub for social media, video consumption, communications, and business applications, as well as traditional voice,” Sanjay Kaul, President, Asia-Pacific and Japan, Service Provider Business, Cisco, said in a statement on Monday.

OnePlus, smartphone
By 2022, smartphones will account for 44 per cent of total Internet traffic, up from 18 per cent in 2017.. Flickr

The Internet is made up of thousands of public and private networks around the world. And since it came to life in 1984, more than 4.7 zettabytes of IP traffic have flowed across it.

One zettabyte is approximately equal to a thousand exabytes, a billion terabytes, or a trillion gigabytes.

In India alone, IP networks carried 108 petabytes of data per day in 2017 and are expected to reach 646 petabytes per day by 2022.

This is primarily driven by the growth in the number of smartphone users, said the report.

Twitter, India, Smartphone
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

By 2022, smartphones will account for 44 per cent of total Internet traffic, up from 18 per cent in 2017.

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In 2018, PCs accounted for 41 percent of total IP traffic, but by 2022 PCs will account for only 19 per cent of IP traffic, the research showed.

Saying that more traffic will be created in 2022 than in the 32 years since the Internet started, the report added that India will be a major driver of this with the total number of Internet users reaching 840 million (60 per cent of the population) by 2022 from 357 million (27 per cent of the population) in 2017. (IANS)