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New Delhi: Criticising the Congress for targeting the Prime Minister’s Office in the National Herald case, the BJP has said that the main opposition party’s vice president Rahul Gandhi has now become a “lying machine”.

If Congress president Sonia Gandhi and vice-president Rahul Gandhi have any evidence, they should place it before the public in the National Herald case. To hide their own corruption they are making baseless allegations against the PMO,” Bharatiya Janata Party national secretary Srikant Sharma said at a press conference at the party headquarters here on Saturday.


Congress party is on one side stalling the proceedings of both the houses of parliament and on the other hand Rahul Gandhi is making baseless allegations. Rahul has now become a lying machine,

The BJP leader also accused the Congress of stalling the progress of the country by disrupting parliament proceedings.

Lok Sabha has passed 10 bills of public importance including Goods and Services Tax (GST) and are waiting for the nod of Rajya Sabha. By stalling the proceedings, Congress is sacrificing the cause of 125 crore Indians merely to save wrongdoings of 10 Janpath (house of Sonia Gandhi),

He also asked the Congress to join the investigation in the case and let parliament function. (IANS)

(Picture Courtesy:indianexpress.com)


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