Thursday November 15, 2018
Home Science & Technology Rajasthan wom...

Rajasthan women farmers successfully battle climate change

0
//
Republish
Reprint

As the United Nations Climate Change Conference ― 21st session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21), is underway in France, women farmers in Rajasthan drylands are implementing their own methods to battle climate change.

The impact of climate change can be felt most strongly in the drylands ecosystem. Rajasthan’s women farmers are adopting methods which would help overcome this obstacle and keep them out of poverty.

Sixty per cent of Rajasthan is covered by the Thar Desert, which spreads over 320,000 sq km. The region sees around two droughts in five years and faces an acute water shortage for 9 to 11 months in a year.

Mani and Rameshwari are women community leaders from Rajasthan’s Derasar village who have brought in improvements in farming and related issues which effectively combat the adversities of climate change.

Embankments have been constructed to prevent runoff soil and erosion, and also to capture rain water. To provide cattle fodder, grasses and fodder tress are planted, while crop varieties which are suited to the region are being concentrated upon. More fruit trees are planted which provide income as well as nutrition, and improved crop varieties such as pearl millet have been introduced.

In a move towards better management of common community resources such as the grazing lands, new institutional agreements have been employed. These agreements will also help the women easily form self-help groups which would allow them to weigh and market livestock in a proper manner, for higher income.

The CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems, which has brought in most of these changes, is working in Rajasthan, Karnataka and, Andhra Pradesh to assist the local institutions and farmers to build farming systems which can prevail against climate change. The program aims to lives of the billions living in rural areas and diminish the degradation of land and other resources in the dryland areas in the world.

The different initiatives are turning out to be quite successful, mainly due to the different organisations who have come together to lend a hand to the cause. The local community received ample assistance from the NGO, Gramin Vikas Vigyan Samiti (GRAVIS), and the scientific expertise lent by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT). Donations from all around the world have also been coming in from donors under the CGIAR program.

ICRISAT scientist Dr Shalander Kumar said, “The strategy takes women’s needs into account by working directly with them. Women are empowered to take charge of their lives and reduce the vulnerability of the communities living in these harsh environments.”

 

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Old Diesel Cars Banned From Summer 2019 In Greater Paris

Fifteen French metropolitan areas including Lyon, Nice, Aix-Marseille and Toulouse last month agreed to install or reinforce low-emission zones by 2020.

0
Paris,diesel
Exhaust fumes escape from the exhaust of a diesel engine car in Paris. VOA

The Greater Paris region will become a low-emission zone from next summer, which will limit the circulation of old diesel cars, the regional authority decided on Monday.

The Metropole du Grand Paris council said on its Twitter feed it had voted to ban diesel cars registered before Dec. 31, 2000 from the area within the A86 second ring-road, which includes Paris and 79 municipalities around it, a region with 5.61 million inhabitants.

The ban will use France’s new “Crit’Air” vignette system, which identifies cars’ age and pollution level with color-coded stickers. Cars with the Crit’Air 5 sticker (1997 to 2000-registered diesels) as well as cars without a sticker will be banned.

Paris,diesel
People cool themselves at the Trocadero Fountain in front of The Eiffel Tower in Paris on July 27, 2018, as a heatwave continues across northern Europe. VOA

The council plans to gradually tighten regulations in order to allow only electric or hydrogen-fueled cars on Greater Paris roads by 2030. In central Paris, pre-2000 diesels have been banned since July 2017.

Also Read: Paris Adopts Climate Action Plan, Aims At Achieving a ‘Zero Carbon’ Future

Fifteen French metropolitan areas including Lyon, Nice, Aix-Marseille and Toulouse last month agreed to install or reinforce low-emission zones by 2020. The French government hopes this will prevent European Union sanctions over non-respect of European air quality standards. (VOA)