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Rajnath stresses for own servers, strong cyber infrastructure

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New Delhi: Pitching for a strong cyber infrastructure in the country, Home Minister Rajnath Singh on Saturday stressed that India should work towards developing its own servers.

Addressing students of the Jaypee Institute of Information Technology (JIIT) during a convocation ceremony in Noida, the home minister said: “As the home minister of the country, I don’t have control on many of the cyber crimes here as the server is located elsewhere.”
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“In order to check growing cyber crime, we must develop cyber infrastructure,” he emphasised.

Echoing Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s call for building I-ways (information highways), the minister said: “We need highways, roads, but we also need I-ways in our country.”

“Our neighbour China has shown us how we can challenge Google by developing its own operating systems,” he added.

Talking about the ongoing Digital India Week launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 1, the home minister said: “Our government is not only promoting digital governance but I am confident that India will soon reinforce its digital dominance in the world.”

Urging the students to use education in a constructive manner, Singh said: “Education while used in a constructive way is always beneficial to society but when abused it may prove dangerous.”

Referring to new manifestations of terrorism, he pointed out that all militants are not illiterate.

“Some of them (militants) are highly qualified and technically sophisticated. This is a clear example of how technology can be abused for creating trouble in society,” the minister said.

(IANS)

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Tibetan Activist Sentenced to 5 Years of Imprisonment in China

A Tibetan education activist was on Tuesday sentenced to five years in prison by a Chinese court for inciting separatism, Amnesty International (AI) said, calling the sentence "unjust" and urging his immediate release.

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A Tibetan education activist was on Tuesday sentenced to five years in prison by a Chinese court for inciting separatism, Amnesty International (AI) said, calling the sentence “unjust” and urging his immediate release.

The main evidence against Tashi Wangchuk, who was sentenced by a court in Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai province, was a 2015 video by the New York Times about his campaign for saving the Tibetan language, according to his lawyer.

“Today’s verdict against Tashi Wangchuk is a gross injustice. He is being cruelly punished for peacefully drawing attention to the systematic erosion of Tibetan culture,” AI East Asia Research Director Joshua Rosenzweig was cited as saying by Efe news.

Before his arrest, the 31-year-old activist had expressed concern over the fact that many Tibetan children could not fluently speak their native language, contributing to the progressive extinction of the Tibetan culture.

Representational Image: Tibetan Teachings
Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

“Tashi must be immediately and unconditionally released,” demanded AI, pointing out that the activist had already spent two years in detention without access to his family.

Rosenzweig claimed that Tashi Wangchuk “was a human rights defender and prisoner of conscience who used the media and China’s own legal system in his struggle to preserve Tibetan language, culture and identity”.

In the New York Times video, the activist had highlighted “the extreme discrimination and restrictions on freedom of expression that Tibetans face in China today”.

Also Read: An Attempt to Preserve Ancient Tibetan Literature

Non-profit Human Rights Watch (HRW) also criticized the prison term for Tashi Wangchuk, whose “only crime was to peacefully call for the right of minority peoples to use their own language”, a right safeguarded by the Chinese Constitution.

“His conviction on bogus separatism charges show that critics of government policy on minorities have no legal protections,” said HRW China Director Sophie Richardson. (IANS)

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