Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Hindu supporters in New York City celebrated the laying of the foundation stone for the Ram temple in Ayodhya. Pixabay

By Arul Louis

Hindus and their supporters in New York City celebrated the laying of the foundation stone for the Ram temple in Ayodhya, ignoring a ban on a video marking the occasion due to pressure from an Islamic group.


About 1,000 people turned up for the celebration on Wednesday evening singing ‘bhajans’ and chanting at a traffic island on Times Square, while two groups of protesters lined up on either side to heckle them.

Earlier, a large video display of Ram and the temple being built in Ayodhya was turned off following protests from a Muslim group claiming it was political.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

However, a video display announcing “Kashmir Siege Day” flashed across from where the Ram Janmabhoomi video was to have been shown.


The participants distributed sweets as Times Square echoed with the “Jai Shri Ram” slogan. IANS

The celebrations were organised by the Ram Janma Bhoomi Shilanyas Celebrations Committee of USA (RJBSCC).

The participants distributed sweets as Times Square echoed with the “Jai Shri Ram” slogan.

A group of Khalistanis and Pakistanis stood on one side of the traffic island and protesters from the South Asian Solidarity Initiative and the Indian American Muslim Council (IAMC) stood on the opposite sside shouting slogans flanking the celebration.

At one point, some of them bearing placards with four-letter word obscenities, moved in closer to the celebration and police marched in to form a phalanx to separate them.

RJBSCC Chairman Jagdish Sewhani told IANS: “We have come to Times Square to celebrate the historic occasion of the start of the building of the sacred temple. We are not bothered by the display being shut down because we are full of joy that our goal of seeing a temple build on the holy ground is becoming a reality. What they do means nothing to us.”


People gathered at the Times Square venue, dressed in traditional clothes. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Also Read: Coronavirus Doesn’t Directly Targets Taste Buds Cells in Patients: Study

He said that after running the display for several hours in the morning, the company that had the video system turned it off when Muslim groups protested saying they do not allow political advertising, even though the display did not have any political message but was purely spiritual with only a large image of Ram and the temple being built and no text.

People started gathering at the Times Square venue, wearing masks and many dressed in traditional clothes, from 3 p.m. for the celebration that started at 7.30 m.

Earlier in the day, IAMC hired a video truck to circle the Times Square with images of the mosque honouring Babar, who is said to have destroyed the original temple on the site after an invasion from what is now Uzbekhistan. (IANS)


Popular

Wikimedia Commons

Elon Musk has renewed his promise to "extend life to Mars".

Following a huge growth in his personal fortune, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has renewed his promise to "extend life to Mars". According to The Star, Musk's wealth has swelled to an astonishing $230 billion. Or a whopping 861 billion Dodgecoin, a cryptocurrency backed by the entrepreneur after he was reported to have invested millions.

Musk is now richer than Bill Gates and Warren Buffett combined, both individuals who had previously held the rich list title. "Elon Musk (with a net worth equal to 861 billion #Dogecoin) is now richer than Bill Gates and Warren Buffett COMBINED!" popular crypto YouTuber Matt Wallace's tweeted.

To which Musk said: "Hopefully enough to extend life to Mars". "Have no doubt you will make it happen," Wallace responded. CEO investments, the creators of Dogecoin, also responded backing Musk's plans every step of the way. The SpaceX Mars programme was initiated by Musk to colonize Mars after he first conceptualized the project back in 2001. SpaceX's aspirational goal has been to land the first humans on Mars by 2024, but in October 2020 Musk named 2024 as the goal for an uncrewed mission. (IANS/ MBI)

Keywords: investments, combined, SpaceX, billion, Elon musk, tesla


Photo by Damir Spanic on Unsplash

A perfume is an essential part of dressing up.

By N. Lothungbeni Humtsoe

A perfume is an essential part of dressing up. Studies confirm that we feel more confident about ourselves if the final touches of our routine is a spritz of lingering perfume. However, how often do you feel that your perfume doesn't last long enough? How often do you feel that the fragrance disappears in a few hours? This is quite a common problem. Let's learn a few hacks to keep you smelling gorgeous all day.

Wearing your perfume right after the shower
Our skin tends to hold onto some moisture right after a shower. This moisture helps to lock the fragments that extend your perfume's longevity.

gray steel shower Our skin tends to hold onto some moisture right after a shower. | Photo by Chandler Cruttenden on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia Commons

I'm nostalgic about Delhi. There's no ideal place to live in, where you are that is your home - Mukundan

By Vishnu Makhijani

Back in the 1960s, the national capital was a "quiet and safe place" where women were not harmed and you could sleep on your terrace "without locking the main house door". Then, "a nouveau riche class prospered" and outwardly, New Delhi today "is a beautiful city" but "beneath lies hunger, filth and diseases".Still, Malayalam author M. Mukundan is nostalgic about a city where he lived for 40 long years before moving back to his hometown of Mahe and this prompted him to write "Delhi - A Soliloquy", translated by Fathima E.V. and Nandakumar K (Westland/Eka) that has been shortlisted for the Rs 25 lakh JCB Prize for Literature, India's richest literary award. "When I was in Delhi, I felt nostalgic about Mahe. Now it is the other way round - I'm nostalgic about Delhi. There's no ideal place to live in, where you are that is your home," Mukundan, four of whose works have been adapted for the big screen, told IANS in an interview.

"In the early 60s when I arrived in Delhi, it was a quiet and safe place. There were villages within the city. After seeing a late night movie at the Race Course theatre, women and children would walk down to Lodhi Colony past midnight. No woman was harmed. "In summer, we used to sleep on the charpoys spread out on the terraces of our houses without locking the main house door down below. It was a city anybody will dream of living. And then Delhi changed all of a sudden - a brutal, grotesque change. "Factories and commercial establishments came up, attracting unemployed poor people from other states. Building mafias destroyed villages and fields and built ugly high-rise buildings. Poor people were pushed away to filthy slums where they led a wretched life of deprivation. Throwing away all values, a nouveau riche class prospered. Outwardly, Delhi is a beautiful city. But beneath lies hunger, filth and diseases," Mukundan elaborated.

Mukundan A Soliloquy" is the story of the changes and growth of the city with Sahadevan's life as the backdrop. Wikimedia Commons

Keep reading... Show less