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Rannvijay to host “Troll Police” and create awareness on cyber-bullying

Rannvijay to host
Rannvijay to host "Troll Police" and create awareness on cyber-bullying. wikimedia common

Mumbai, Dec 30, 2017: Actor-presenter Rannvijay Singh will be the face and host of the upcoming season of “Troll Police”, which will bring celebrities and their trolls face-to-face.

The objective of the show is to showcase how in today’s day and age it is no big deal for one to log on to any social media platform and make obscene comments on a person’s physical appearance or the kind of attire they opt for.

MTV has roped in investigators and a cyber team that traces these trolls and the faces behind the acts and Bollywood celebrities will then confront the faces behind these trolls.

Rannvijay will educate the youth, create awareness and highlight the issue of cyber bullying.

“As they say with great power comes great responsibility, I really feel that while internet has given us the power to voice our opinion, there are a lot of people who do not use this boon wisely,” Rannvijay said in a statement.

Trolling is common nowadays and one of the major reasons for it is the “need for attention”.

“But if one feels that one can hide his or her identity and use it as a platform to send inflammatory and off-topic messages and get away with it, it is absolutely wrong.

“It is a sign of cowardice. I hope ‘Troll Police’ enables a lot of people out there to voice their issues if they are being trolled, because trolling someone is a serious offence,” he added.

“Troll Police” will premiere on MTV in January 2018. (IANS)

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Social Media Can Affect Teenagers’ Real Life Relationships

The increased screen time could also convert to more problems offline, the findings showed

social media
Social Media can potentially affect teenager's real life relationships too. Pixabay
  • Social media can severely affect the relationship of teenagers
  • Many teenagers are victims of online bullying
  • More time online can cause problems offline too

Even as effects of social media use on mental well-being is hotly debated, a new study says that spending too much time online can create problems in real life relationship of teenagers and vice versa.

Social Media can potentially damage teenagers' real life relationships. Wikimedia Commons
Social Media can potentially damage teenagers’ real life relationships. Wikimedia Commons

Results of a survey conducted by Professor Candice Odgers of University of California, Irvine and her colleagues showed teenagers from low-income families reported more physical fights, face-to-face arguments and trouble at school that spilt over from social media.

On the other hand, the researchers found that adolescents from economically disadvantaged households are also more likely to be bullied and victimised in cyberspace.

“The majority of young people appear to be doing well in the digital age, and many are thriving with the new opportunities that electronic media provides. But those who are already struggling offline need our help online too,” Odgers said.

Also Read: Social Media Giant, Facebook Introduces Ad Performance Measurement Solutions

Many teenagers are victims of cyberbullying. Pixabay
Many teenagers are victims of cyberbullying. Pixabay

In a commentary published in the journal Nature, Odgers argued that while smartphones should not be seen as universally bad, vulnerable teenagers experience greater negative effects of life online.

“What we’re seeing now may be the emergence of a new kind of digital divide, in which differences in online experiences are amplifying risks among already vulnerable adolescents,” said Odgers, who is also a fellow in Canadian Institute for Advanced Research’s Child & Brain Development programme.

For the last 10 years, Odgers has been tracking adolescents’ mental health and their use of smartphones.

In her survey of North Carolina schoolchildren, 48 percent of 11-year-olds said they owned a mobile phone as did eighty-five percent of 14-year-olds.

Also Read: Social Media in India: Understanding The Dynamics of ‘Facebook’ and ‘Twitter’

The study showed that teenagers from families with a household income of less than $35,000 per year spent three more hours a day on screen media watching TV and online videos than teenagers in families with an annual income of more than $100,000.

More time online can cause problems in real life. Pixabay
More time online can cause problems in real life. Pixabay

The increased screen time could also convert to more problems offline, the findings showed.

“The evidence so far suggests that smartphones may serve as mirrors reflecting problems teens already have. Those from low-income families said that social media experiences more frequently spilt over into real life, causing more offline fights and problems at school,” Odgers said. IANS