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Rape Survivors in India Still Face Humiliation with Two-Finger tests and Barriers to Justice says Human Rights Watch

Indian Rape survivors still face barriers in justice and humiliation with two-finger tests, reported the Human Rights Watch

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Rape Survivors
Rape survivors face humiliation during investigation. Pixabay.

New Delhi, Nov 9: Five years after the Nirbhaya gang rape case in Delhi, rape survivors are still facing barriers to getting justice in India, Human Rights Watch said on Wednesday.

Rape survivors in India face significant barriers to obtaining justice and critical support services despite legal and other reforms adopted since the December 16, 2012 gang rape-murder of a 19-year-old physiotherapy intern in the national capital, who came to be known as ‘Nirbhaya’, said the international human rights NGO in an 82-page report “Everyone Blames Me: Barriers to Justice and Support Services for Sexual Assault Survivors in India” released on Wednesday.

The report said women and girls who survived rape and other sexual violence often suffered humiliation at police stations and hospitals.

“Police are frequently unwilling to register complaints, victims and witnesses receive little protection, and medical professionals still compel degrading two finger tests. These obstacles to justice and dignity are compounded by inadequate healthcare, counselling, and legal support for victims during criminal trials of the accused,” an HRW statement said.

“Five years ago, Indians shocked by the brutality of the gang rape in Delhi, called for an end to the silence around sexual violence and demanded criminal justice reforms,” said Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia Director of HRW.

“Today, there are stronger laws and policies, but much remains to be done to ensure that police, doctors, and courts treat survivors with dignity,” she said.

The HRW said it conducted field research and interviews in Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, and Rajasthan — selected because of their large number of reported rape cases — as well as Delhi and Mumbai.

The report details 21 cases — 10 cases involving girls under the age of 18.

Rape survivors
Rape survivors feel harassed at police stations and hospitals. Pixabay.

The findings are drawn from more than 65 interviews with victims, their family members, lawyers, human rights activists, doctors, forensic experts, and government and police officials, as well as research by Indian organisations.

“Under the Indian law, police officers who fail to register a complaint of sexual assault face up to two years in prison. However, Human Rights Watch found that police did not always file a First Information Report (FIR), the first step to initiating a police investigation, especially if the victim was from an economically or socially marginalised community.

“In several cases, the police resisted filing the FIR or pressured the victim’s family to ‘settle’ or ‘compromise’, particularly if the accused was from a powerful family or community,” the statement said.

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It said that lack of witness protection law in India makes rape survivors and witnesses vulnerable to pressure that undermines prosecutions.

The human rights body said that some defence lawyers and judges still use language in courtrooms that is “biased and derogatory” toward sexual assault survivors.

“The attempt at shaming the victim is still very much prevalent in the courts,” Rebecca Mammen John, a senior criminal lawyer in Delhi, was quoted in the statement. (IANS)

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The Challenges, Growth and Prospects of Olive Oil Industry in India

Discussing the growth, prospects of olive oil in India

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Olive oil
For the first time in the country, experts in India will hold a panel discussion about the olive oil industry. Pixabay

BY PUJA GUPTA

For the first time in the country, experts in India will hold a panel discussion on the challenges, growth and prospects of the olive oil industry on the 13th of December at PHD Chamber of Commerce & Industry.

Rahul Upadhyay, President and Akshay Modi, Vice-President at The Indian Olive Association (IOA) will be hosting the Annual Public at the Lakshmipat Singhania Auditorium. The session will discuss the transition of olive oil from being a foreign oil to a homegrown oil with which the citizens of India can now reckon with.

The panel moderated by senior food and travel writer Rupali Dean will spearhead the session on Olive Oil In India-2.0. The panel of speakers will include noted restaurateurs, chefs, nutritionists, food researchers and biologists, entrepreneurs, retailers, food, health and fitness experts.

Olive oil india
The Indian Olive Association focuses on the problems confronting the emerging sector of olive oil and table olives in India. Pixabay

Upadhyay said, “The Indian Olive Association focuses on the problems confronting the emerging sector of olive oil and table olives in India. With Annual Public Session, we attempt to bring together the doyens from the food and health industry to discuss the problems and offer solutions that will accelerate the growth of olive oil in India.”

Akshay Modi, Vice-President at The Indian Olive Association (IOA). “The Annual Public Session is a platform that brings together all the diverse stakeholders to speak a unified voice for the greater good of the category of olive oil in India.”

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The Indian Olive Association (IOA), the national apex association of olive oil producers, growers, distributors, importers, users and consumers in India works to promote consumption and expand the market for olive oil and table olives. The association focuses on the problems confronting this emerging sector in India. Macro-economic factors like GST, Import Duty and issues with respect to the import of both table olives and olive oil are taken up by IOA with multiple authorities to streamline the import process and ensure a steady growth for this category. (IANS)