Tuesday January 28, 2020

Rate of Suicide among Active Duty Service Members Increased over Past Five Years

The report comes after three U.S. sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush died by apparent suicide last week

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Suicide, Duty, Service
Members of the graduating class march during Parade Day at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, May 22, 2019. VOA

The rate of suicide among active duty service members has increased significantly over the past five years, according to a Pentagon report released on Thursday.

The report comes after three U.S. sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush died by apparent suicide last week, incidents the Navy has said are separate and unrelated.

The Pentagon’s first annual suicide report said that the rate of suicide deaths among active duty service members was 24.8 per 100,000 service members, up from just under 20 per 100,000 in 2013. In 2018, 541 service members died by suicide, the report said, adding that the most common method of suicide was with firearms.

“We are not going in the right direction,” Elizabeth Van Winkle, director of the office of force resiliency, told reporters.

Suicide, Duty, Service
The rate of suicide among active duty service members has increased significantly over the past five years, according to a Pentagon report released on Thursday. Pixabay

During the briefing, the Pentagon took the unusual step of advising reporters on how to cover suicides, such as not calling it a “growing problem” or “skyrocketing” because it could cause contagion.

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Wednesday that the military was caught up in “what some call a national epidemic of suicide among our youth.”

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“I wish I could tell you we have an answer to prevent further, future suicides in the Armed Services,” Esper said. “We don’t.” (VOA)

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Amazon’s Music Streaming Service Hits 55 Million Subscribers Globally

Amazon Music Unlimited plan runs $9.99 a month, or $7.99 a month for Prime members who upgrade

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Amazon's
Amazon's music streaming service has grown about 50 per cent in Britain, Germany, Japan, and the US during the past year, and it is also gaining new listeners in countries such as France, Italy, Mexico and Spain. VOA

Amazon’s music streaming service ‘Amazon Music’ has reached 55 million subscribers globally closing in on Apple Music which has over 60 million users.

“Our strategy is unique and, like everything we do at Amazon, starts with our customers. We have always been focused on expanding the marketplace for music streaming by offering music listener’s unparalleled choice because we know that different listeners have different needs,” Steve Boom, VP of Amazon Music said in a statement recently.

“As we continue to lead in our investment in voice with Alexa, and in high-quality audio with Amazon Music HD, we’re excited to bring our customers and the music industry even more innovation in 2020 and beyond,” Steve added.

Amazon’s streaming music service has grown about 50 per cent in Britain, Germany, Japan, and the US during the past year, and it is also gaining new listeners in countries such as France, Italy, Mexico and Spain.

Amazon's
Amazon’s music streaming service ‘Amazon Music’ has reached 55 million subscribers globally closing in on Apple Music which has over 60 million users. Wikimedia Commons

Amazon Music Unlimited plan runs $9.99 a month, or $7.99 a month for Prime members who upgrade.

With the Single device plan, customers can subscribe to Amazon Music Unlimited at $3.99 per month to access more than 50 million songs on their Fire TV or Echo device.

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While, the family plan allows six family members to access the service for $14.99 per month, or $149 per year for Prime members. (IANS)