Sunday September 23, 2018

Consumption of Raw Fruits And Veggies Boost Mental Health

Eating raw fruit and vegetables such as kiwis, bananas, apples, dark leafy greens, cucumber, and carrots may lower symptoms of depression and improve mental health, more than cooked, canned and processed food, say researchers.

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Here is good news for women who are suffering from hearing loss. A new study has found that consuming healthy food may decrease the risk of hearing loss in women.
Healthy Diet, Pixabay
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Eating raw fruit and vegetables such as kiwis, bananas, apples, dark leafy greens, cucumber, and carrots may lower symptoms of depression and improve mental health, more than cooked, canned and processed food, say researchers.

The findings showed that consuming raw fruits and vegetables leads to lower levels of mental illness symptomology, such as depression.

It also improved levels of psychological well-being including a positive mood and life satisfaction.

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons
The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons

“Our research has highlighted that the consumption of fruit and vegetables in their ‘unmodified’ state is more strongly associated with better mental health compared to cooked/canned/processed fruit and vegetables,” said lead author Tamlin Conner, senior lecturer at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand.

However, when the fruits and vegetables are cooked, canned and processed, they lose their mental health benefits as the process potentially diminishes the nutrient levels, Conner noted.

“Cooking and processing likely limits the delivery of nutrients that are essential for optimal emotional functioning,” Conner said.

 

The amendment is part of Food Safety and Standards Rules, 2017
Representational Image. pixabay

 

For the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, more than 400 young adults from New Zealand and the US aged 18 to 25 years were surveyed.

Conner says public health campaigns have historically focused on aspects of quantity for the consumption of fruit and vegetables (such as 5+ a day).

However, the new study found that for mental health in particular, it may also be important to consider the way in which produce was prepared and consumed.

Also Read: Food Preservative Shows Promise In Schizophrenia Treatment

“This research is increasingly vital as lifestyle approaches such as dietary change may provide an accessible, safe and adjuvant approach to improving mental health,” Conner said.  (IANS)

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New App May Encourage Kids to eat Veggies

The free app is available for download from iTunes and Android

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Parents get a say in the game too, by selecting the vegetables (from a choice of 10) they want their children to play with. Pixabay

If your child does not like to eat vegetables, a new gaming app may be of help. Researchers have developed the app designed to entice kids to healthy eating options through exposure to various vegetables.

Named Vegetable Maths Masters, the app unveils the world of vegetables for children between the ages of 3 and 7 years via a maths gaming app where children can practise core maths skills.

Depending on the child’s age they can count with vegetables, draw numbers with vegetables, add/subtract with vegetables and practise multiplication and division.

“We have developed an app which draws on psychological research to integrate different methods known to increase interest in vegetables and eagerness to try them,” one of the researchers Claire Farrow from Aston University in Britain said in a statement.

child
Depending on the child’s age they can count with vegetables, draw numbers with vegetables, add/subtract with vegetables and practise multiplication and division. Pixabay

“Social norms also influence food preferences, for example if child characters in the game like and enjoy eating vegetables, research suggests that children are more likely to try them,” Farrow added.

In order to play, the kids need to choose a character, then feed it 10 different vegetables after which, the character gives a positive feedback. They earn stars as they complete problems which can be traded for props to decorate an animated vegetable.

Parents get a say in the game too, by selecting the vegetables (from a choice of 10) they want their children to play with.

Also Read: Google Helps Autistic Kids Read Facial Expressions

“The game is based around psychological research which suggests that children become less weary of vegetables and more willing to taste them the more that they are repeatedly exposed to them,” Farrow added.

The free app is available for download from iTunes and Android, the Aston University statement added. (IANS)