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Indo-Pak relations: Real journalism or propaganda of blame game ?

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By Surbhi Moudgil

A montage of the India-Pakistan international relations can be sketched upon the blame game trepidations of either sides. This never ending disquieting argument of finding each other at fault is a trait which is logical at time and at times completely absurd.

With no tangible international organisation in existence to have a superior authority over the two countries to execute a line-up, the gruesome animosity is merely going to distress the people, and not the politicians.

With all said and done by the respective governments, it’s the media which feeds itself out of this interphase between the silence of proposition. Recently, an editorial called “Security State” in a leading English daily of Pakistan, mentioned India as their foremost nemesis. This proposition was put forth on the basis of apparent, ulterior motives of India to hamper the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) project, highlighted by the Frontier Works Organisation (FWO).

The tapping of media in the political interphase, between the two nations on unproven allegations simply crushes the neutrality of media. To allege a country as nemesis just on the basis of speculation and truling to force an argument on the state of conflict amongst them only represents failure of media ethics.

For how long can the organized outrage of media be justified as real journalism?

Fuelling the hatred towards India is turning into the crust of Pakistan’s domestic as well as foreign policy. By the tossing of blame on to the other side of LOC, Pakistan keeps itself in peace.

This unparalleled strategy of Pakistan military to attack the integrity of India is a primordial strategy of Pakistan and fuelling of such statements by the media, validates it. The editorial also glorified the Pakistan Army over their elected members of parliament, stating “When the divide between the civilian leadership and the army is discussed, it is clear that the army functions effectively and fills the gaps in all arenas where the civilian leadership fails time and time again.”

The media needs to take a high road of unprejudiced journalism, focusing only on evidence and not fall prey to political motives of a state, be it on this side or that side of the border.

 

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U.S. And South Korea Work Towards Improving Diplomacy With North Korea

About one hour before the scheduled meeting, around 40 Korean-Americans gathered near the near the White House in a show of support for President Moon, chanting slogans like “Peace maker president” and “We love Moon!”

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White House
US President Donald Trump welcomes South Korean President Moon Jae-in to the White House in Washington, DC, April 11, 2019. RFA

South Korean President Moon Jae-In and U.S. President Donald Trump agreed Thursday to keep up diplomacy with North Korea, including possible new summit talks with the North’s leader Kim Jong Un, but the allies disagreed on the level of economic sanctions needed to press Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons.

At their first meeting since Trump’s failed Hanoi summit with Kim Jong Un in February, Trump argued for keeping in place sanctions designed to starve the North’s nuclear and missile programs of hard currency, while saying he was open to meeting Kim a third time.

“We want sanctions to remain in place,” Trump said at the White House, according to U.S. media. “I think that sanctions right now are at a level that’s a fair level.”

U.S.
Kim is “a person I’ve gotten to know very well, and respect and hopefully, and I really believe over a period of time, a lot of tremendous things will happen. I think North Korea has a tremendous potential,” Trump told reporters before the talks. VOA

“There are various smaller deals that maybe could happen,” Trump said. “You could work out step-by-step pieces, but at this moment, we’re talking about the big deal. The big deal is we have to get rid of the nuclear weapons.”

Moon did not mention sanctions directly in his White House appearance, but he has called for sanctions relief to coax North Korea to begin nuclear disarmament.

North Korea experts say that Moon, who wants to remove curbs on inter-Korean economic projects, would privately lobby Trump for a gesture to keep Kim engaged in the diplomacy.

The Vietnam summit ended in disagreement over how Kim might shed its nuclear arsenal, as Trump demands and the sanctions relief that Kim seeks as a reward for cooperating.

Trump, who also met Kim in Singapore last year, said: “I enjoy the summits, I enjoy being with the chairman.”

Kim is “a person I’ve gotten to know very well, and respect and hopefully, and I really believe over a period of time, a lot of tremendous things will happen. I think North Korea has a tremendous potential,” Trump told reporters before the talks.

Moon said he was hopeful that a third U.S.-North Korea summit would happen. His national security adviser said Thursday that Moon would also try to have another meeting with Kim.

Bruce Klingner, a senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation think tank in Washington, told RFA that the disagreement about sanctions shows a rift between the U.S. and South Korea in terms of North Korea policy.

“It showed two allies remain far apart on approach to North Korea. President Moon wants to reward North Korea even though there has been no movement in denuclearization. The U.S. said it has no interest in that approach,” he said.

U.S.
U.S. President Donald Trump agreed Thursday to keep up diplomacy with North Korea, including possible new summit talks with the North’s leader Kim Jong Un, but the allies disagreed on the level of economic sanctions needed to press Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons. Pixabay

Richard Bush, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution said, “I give President Moon credit for trying to engage President Trump on [the North Korea] issue and trying to get closer alignment in our strategy toward North Korea. It appears that his attempt didn’t make too much progress.”

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About one hour before the scheduled meeting, around 40 Korean-Americans gathered near the near the White House in a show of support for President Moon, chanting slogans like “Peace maker president” and “We love Moon!”

Meanwhile, a smaller group of 10 Korean-Americans chanted phrases in support of Trump’s hard line on North Korea and accused Moon of being a North Korean spy. (RFA)