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Recent Archaeological Digs Show the Remains of ‘Skull Cult’ in Turkey

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Gobekli Tepe, Turkey
Gobekli Tepe was a place where the people from the Stone Age use to gather around 9,000 years ago. Wikimedia
  • A study by the German Archaeological Institute suggested that Gobekli Tepe was a place of ritualistic significance
  • There were 691 fragments of bones at the site and 408 of them belonged to human skulls
  • There were no signs of decapitation and it was clear that the changes were made shortly after their death

Turkey, July 1, 2017: Gobekli Tepe was a place where the people from the Stone Age use to gather around 9,000 years ago. It was a time long before the kingdoms or the kings use to rule the lands.

A study by the German Archaeological Institute released in the journal ‘Science Advances’ suggested that Gobekli Tepe was a place of ritualistic significance performed by the early humans.

It is inevident that the people who were buried died there, but there were 691 fragments of bones and 408 of them belonged to human skulls. Moreover, according to the study the site also consisted of monolithic T-shaped limestone pillars and a stockpile of limestone sculptures. In fact, the research also shows the signs of deliberate modifications on the skull fragments.

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Deep grooves across the foreheads of the skull were also found and some skulls even had hole drilled into it. It showed the signs that the skulls were put on display so that the visitors could see them hanging. Though there were no signs of decapitation and it was clear that the changes were made shortly after the death of those people.

These kinds of remains were also found in other archaeological sites where the skulls were used to worship and in the ancient cities of Anatolia and Levant.

Anthropologists say that these practices were because people used human skulls for various reasons- some people used to worship ancestors, others thought the dead could protect the living and some groups also used skulls of their animals to display. They refer to these groups as ‘Skull Cults’.

Gobekli Tepe also seems to be one of the oldest skull cults that the researchers have come across till now.

– by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

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2,648 illegal Migrants detained in Turkey

According to an official statement by Turkish General Staff , Turkish border guards rounded up 1,632 migrants attempting to illegally enter Turkey from Syria

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Turkey launches nationwide operation to detain illegal migrants (representative image) Pixabay

Turkey, November 9, 2017: A total of 2,648 undocumented migrants were detained in nationwide operations across Turkey, security force said on Wednesday.

Turkish border guards rounded up 1,632 migrants attempting to illegally enter Turkey from Syria, the Turkish General Staff said in a statement, Xinhua reported.

Some 171 undocumented migrants were found attempting to cross Turkey-Greece border illegally, according to the statement.

Another 575 migrants trying to illegally enter Greece and Bulgaria were held in northwestern Edirne province, a security official told state-run Anadolu Agency.

Gendarmerie caught 126 migrants, including 104 Afghan and 22 Pakistani nationals, from a bus at a checkpoint in Turkey’s central province of Sivas.

During another operation in northern Kastamonu province, security forces stopped an Istanbul-bound bus and held 121 migrants, including Pakistanis, Afghans and Senegalese. (IANS)

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Female Mobility Key Element in Cultural Interchange during Stone Age and Bronze Age: Study

4,000 years ago European women left their birth settlements and travelled far to form families, taking with them new objects and cultural ideas

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Female mobility during the Stone Age and Bronze Age was a key element in cultural interchange (Representational Image). Pixabay

Berlin, Sep 05, 2017: Female mobility during the final phase of the Stone Age and start of the Bronze Age was a key element in cultural interchange between regions, according to a new study.

The study, published on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) magazine, shows how 4,000 years ago European women left their birth settlements and travelled far to form families, taking with them new objects and cultural ideas, Germany’s Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History said.

The report is based on the graves found in the Lech valley, south of the city of Augsburg, reports Efe news.

In the families living in the settlements in the region at that time, the majority of women came from other areas, probably from Bohemia or central Germany several hundred kilometres away, while the men normally remained in or very near their birth location.

According to the researchers, this “patrilocal” type of social pattern, in which new couples live in the territory of the man’s family, combined with individual female mobility, was not a temporary phenomenon but rather lasted for some 800 years during the transition from the Stone Age to the Bronze Age.

Participating in the study headed by Philipp Stockhammer, of Munich’s Ludwig-Maximilians University, were Corina Knipper of the Curt-Engelhorn-Centre for Archaeometry, along with Alissa Mittnik and Johannes Krause of the Max Planck Institute and the University of Tuebingen.

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“Individual mobility was a major feature characterising the lives of people in Central Europe even in the third and early second millennium,” said Stockhammer regarding a phenomenon that the researchers believe fostered the development of new technologies in the Bronze Age.

The scientific team used genetic and isotope analysis along with archaeological evaluations to research the remains of 84 individuals buried between 2,500 and 1,650 B.C. in cemeteries belonging to individual homesteads and containing up to several dozen burials made over several generations. (IANS)

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Archeologists Unearth 6,000 years old Neolithic remains in Istanbul during a new Metro line Construction

Discovery may disclose significant information about the early settlement alongside the strait. Strait, one of the world's most important sea routes connecting the Black Sea and the Aegean Sea

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Archeology , Neolithic artefacts.
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

Istanbul, August 22, 2017: Archeologists have unearthed Neolithic remains believed to be dating back to 6,000 years during a new metro line construction in central Istanbul.

Neolithic circular structures and urn type burials were discovered by the Istanbul Archeology Museum experts at the construction site of the subway station in Besiktas district, Xinhua news agency reported.

According to the experts, the discovery will reveal important information that would shed light on the history of Istanbul and the Bosphorus Strait separating the city’s Asian and European sides.

“This discovery located at the very center of the city will definitely fill an important gap in the history of the region between 6,500 and 3,000s B.C.,” Itir Bayburtluoglu, an archeologist told Xinhua.

“I believe it will disclose significant information about the early settlement alongside the strait, one of the world’s most important sea routes connecting the Black Sea and the Aegean Sea,” she said.

In April, archaeologists have first unearthed some 19th and 20th-century ruins at the same site.

Following that discovery, the authorities have slightly shifted the location of the metro station allowing the experts to dig further the bottom layers.

In Bayburtluoglu’s view, the site likely hosts more artifacts belonging to the earlier periods and they could be retrieved as the excavations move forward. (IANS)