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Red-hot Voyage to Sun Will Bring us Closer to our Star

Liftoff is set for the pre-dawn hours of Saturday

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Red-hot voyage
This image made available by NASA shows an artist's rendering of the Parker Solar Probe approaching the Sun. It's designed to take solar punishment like never before, thanks to its revolutionary heat shield that’s capable of withstanding 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit (1,370 degrees Celsius). (VOA)

A red-hot voyage to the sun is going to bring us closer to our star than ever before.

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe will get nearly seven times closer to the sun than previous spacecraft. It will hurtle through the sizzling solar atmosphere and come within nearly 4 million miles of the surface.

Also Read: SpaceX Launches Communications Satellite

It’s designed to take solar punishment like never before, thanks to its revolutionary heat shield that’s capable of withstanding 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. To snuggle up to the sun, it will fly past Venus seven times over seven years.

Liftoff is set for the pre-dawn hours of Saturday. (VOA)

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University of Iowa Wins $115 Million Grant from NASA to Develop Satellites for Studying Radiation Created by the Sun

The NASA grant will underwrite development of satellites expected to be launched within the next three years

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University of Iowa, Radiation, Sun
FILE - Tourists take pictures of a NASA sign at the Kennedy Space Center visitors complex in Cape Canaveral, Florida, April 14, 2010. VOA

A University of Iowa team has won a $115 million grant to develop satellites for studying a system of radiation created by the sun — “space weather.”

The NASA grant will underwrite development of satellites expected to be launched within the next three years with more satellites developed by Southwest Research Institute scientists.

University of Iowa, Radiation, Sun
A University of Iowa team has won a $115 million grant to develop satellites. Pixabay

The Iowa City Press-Enterprise reports that the satellites are designed to gather data on how the sun creates solar wind and how Earth responds to the solar wind. NASA scientists say goal is to understand what drives space weather so humans can mitigate any harmful effects.

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NASA official Nicky Fox says solar particles generated by the sun can interfere with undersea cables, power grids, radio communications and other electronic equipment. (VOA)