Tuesday August 20, 2019

Red Meat Consumption may Increase Breast Cancer Risk

Red meat has been identified as a probable carcinogen

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Red Meat, Breast Cancer, Risk
Researchers have found that red meat consumption may increase breast cancer risk while poultry consumption may prove to be protective against the disease. Pixabay

Red meat may be alluring to the taste buds but one cannot ignore the health risks associated with it. Researchers have found that red meat consumption may increase breast cancer risk while poultry consumption may prove to be protective against the disease.

“Red meat has been identified as a probable carcinogen. Our study adds further evidence that red meat consumption may be associated with increased risk of breast cancer whereas poultry was associated with decreased risk,” said Dale P. Sandler from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in the US.

For the study published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers analysed information on consumption of different types of meat and meat cooking practices of 42,012 women who were followed for an average of 7.6 years.

During follow-up, 1,536 invasive breast cancers were diagnosed. It was found that increasing consumption of red meat was associated with increased risk of invasive breast cancer – women who consumed the highest amount of red meat had a 23 per cent higher risk compared with women who consumed the lowest amount.

Red Meat, Breast Cancer, Risk
Red meat may be alluring to the taste buds but one cannot ignore the health risks associated with it. Pixabay

Conversely, increasing consumption of poultry was associated with decreased invasive breast cancer risk – women with the highest consumption had a 15 per cent lower risk than those with the lowest consumption.

Breast cancer was reduced even further for women who substituted poultry for meat.

“Processed meat is usually made up of red meat but it also contains nitrates and nitrites which further break down to form carcinogen. It is recommended that not more than 455 gram of cooked red meat should be consumed in a week,” Parag Kumar, Consultant, Surgical Oncology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospital in New Delhi, told IANS.

However, according to Rashmi Sharma, Senior Consultant, Surgical Oncology (breast services) at Narayanan Superspeciality Hospital in Gurugram, red meat is an important source of good quality protein and micro-nutrients such as iron and zinc.

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“Women of childbearing age need this good quality protein for foetal development. But red meat also increases the chances of getting breast cancer so women should substitute this with poultry to get proteins and at the same time prevent getting breast cancer,” Sharma told IANS.

According to Nitin Leekha, Senior Consultant, Surgical Oncology at Jaypee Hospital in Noida, apart from reducing the consumption of red meat, there are a number of precautions and other lifestyle improvements which reduce the risk of cancer. (IANS)

Next Story

40-Year-Old Woman Suffering from Breast Cancer Delivers Baby through IVF Method

However, before starting the treatment for cancer Radhika had her ovaries frozen, said Dr Mandavi Rai, IVF expert at Indira IVF Hospital, here, who treated her

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IVF method
Terming it a unique case, doctors said delivering a baby by cancer patients post chemotherapy gets tougher with the age. Pixabay

A 40-year-old woman suffering from breast cancer for over five years has delivered a boy through in vitro fertilization (IVF) method. The patient Radhika (name changed) was diagnosed with breast cancer with cancerous changes without any metastasis, seven years ago and was undergoing treatment. She had been married for 17 years and decided to go for artificial reproductive techniques to enjoy motherhood.

The couple underwent a series of tests. The reports revealed normal semen analysis, but she had a poor ovarian reserve due to repeated chemotherapy cycles and cancer medications. However, before starting the treatment for cancer Radhika had her ovaries frozen, said Dr Mandavi Rai, IVF expert at Indira IVF Hospital, here, who treated her.

“Moreover with a endometrium (the mucous membrane lining the uterus) of 5.2 mm thickness against the normal 7-12 mm thickness it was impossible for Radhika to conceive. Such complications are crucial for patients and it’s the most difficult aspects of IVF procedure. Multiple procedures, including platelet-rich plasma therapy (PRP) to thicken her endometrium before the actual IVF procedure were performed. Her decision to get her eggs frozen before starting the cancer treatment helped,” said Dr Rai.

According to doctors, PRP therapy is proving to be a boon for such patients. The therapy involves extracting platelets through the centrifugation process from the patient’s blood. The therapy also improves the body’s resistance. The patient underwent three PRP therapy sessions with 3-5 ml of platelet-rich plasma injected at regular intervals. Significant growth was observed after each session. The thickness of endometrium at the end of 14-day therapy was found to be 8.2 mm, which is enough to conceive and healthy implantation of the embryo through IVF technique.

IVF method
However, before starting the treatment for cancer Radhika had her ovaries frozen, said Dr Mandavi Rai, IVF expert at Indira IVF Hospital, here, who treated her. Pixabay

For Radhika, once the once the endometrium lining reached 8.2 mm progesterone was started with the help of her frozen eggs and her husband’s sperms leading to formation of embryos, which were cultured until two blastocysts were transferred. After four weeks, an ultrasound confirmed intrauterine gestational sac with cardiac activity. “High-risk obstetric care was provided throughout the treatment. The patient underwent elective caesarean and delivered a boy, weighing 3 kg with no abnormalities,” said Dr Mandavi.

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Terming it a unique case, doctors said delivering a baby by cancer patients post chemotherapy gets tougher with the age. “Cryo-preservation and PRP techniques are gaining popularity among Indians. Several working women, especially in their early 30’s, have started opting for egg freezing,” said Dr Sagarika Aggarwal, a Delhi-based gynaecologist.

“Hemotherapy, which is treatment involving the administration of fresh blood, a blood fraction, or a blood preparation, in most cases acts as a big challenge for IVF treatment as chemotherapeutic drugs deplete the quantity as well as quality of eggs. Conceiving after cancer treatment through IVF is rare and the success rate is very low,” said Dr Nupur Gupta, gynaecologist, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon. (IANS)