Tuesday February 25, 2020

Expert: Red Meat, Pork Improve Fertility

Most adults across the globe have chronically low intakes of selenium due to poor levels in soil

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Expert: Red Meat, Pork Improve Fertility
Eat less meat to meet climate targets, claims study. Pixabay

Nutrients found in red meat play an important role in fertility levels and the general health of women and men planning a pregnancy, says an expert.

The intake of red meat and pork can make a difference, reports femalefirst.co.uk

“Red meat is often associated with fertility in so-called ‘old wives’ tales’ and has been traditionally encouraged in the diets of couples trying for a baby. Now we know from scientific research that the nutrients found in red meat really do have a role in normal fertility,” said Carrie Ruxton from the Meat Advisory Panel.

The Meat Advisory Panel is a group of healthcare professionals who provide independent and objective information about red meat.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Most adults across the globe have chronically low intakes of selenium due to poor levels in soil.

Hence, numerous reports implicate selenium deficiency in several reproductive complications including male and female infertility, miscarriage, preeclampsia, foetal growth restriction, preterm labour, gestational diabetes and obstetric cholestasis.

Pork is an excellent source of selenium and can, therefore, go some way to boosting selenium levels in adults, thus supporting normal reproduction.

Also Read: Lifestyle Changes Can Cure Infertility

Vitamin B6 is one of the most important vitamins for conceiving and fertility because it contributes to the regulation of normal hormonal activity. Again, red meat is a rich source of Vitamin B6.

“The Government recommends that adults eat up to 500 gm of cooked red meat a week which gives the opportunity for four to five meat meals a week, including pork, ham, beef, lamb and bacon,” added Ruxton. (IANS)

Next Story

This Healthy Mediterranean Diet Includes Meat to Cater to Western Tastes

New Mediterranean diet lets you eat meat without any guilt

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Meat Diet
Eat meat without any guilt by following this new mediterranean diet. Lifetime Stock

Researchers have developed a new version of Mediterranean diet that includes meat to cater to Western tastes and also deliver health benefits.

A typical Mediterranean diet includes extra virgin olive oil, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, wholegrain breads, pastas and cereals, moderate amount of fish and red wine, and low consumption of red meat, sweet and processed foods.

The new version of the Mediterranean diet includes 2-3 serves (250g) of fresh lean pork each week.

The findings published in the journal Nutrients showed that the Mediterranean-Pork (Med-Pork) diet delivers cognitive benefits.

meat
The new version of the Mediterranean diet includes 2-3 serves (250g) of meat each week. Lifetime Stock

“The Mediterranean diet is widely accepted as the healthiest diet and is renowned for delivering improved cardiovascular and cognitive health, but in Western cultures, the red meat restrictions of the diet could make it hard for people to stick to,” said Alexandra Wade from University of South Australia.

“By adding pork to the Mediterranean diet, we’re broadening the appeal of the diet, while also delivering improved cognitive function,” Wade said.

This study compared the cognitive effects of people aged 45-80 years and at risk of cardiovascular disease following a Med-Pork or a low-fat diet (often prescribed to negate risk factors for cardiovascular disease).

The results showed the Med-Pork intervention outperformed the low-fat diet, delivering higher cognitive processing speeds and emotional functioning, both markers of good mental health.

Also Read- Nipah Virus has Serious Epidemic Potential: Health Experts

“Improving people’s processing speed shows the brain is working well,” Wade said.

“Then, when you add the fact that pork production emits only a fraction of the greenhouse gases compared with beef, and the Med-Pork diet is really ticking all boxes — taste, health and environment,” Wade said. (IANS)