Monday October 22, 2018
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To Reduce Osteoarthritis Pain, Have Fish Oil and Spinach Everyday

Vitamin K is needed for vitamin-K-dependent (VKD) proteins, which are found in bone and cartilage.

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An increase in foods rich in vitamin K such as kale, spinach and parsley was also found to deliver benefits to patients with osteoarthritis.
Osteoarthritis, Pixabay
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Consuming one gram of fish oil every day and including spinach in the diet could help reduce the pain of patients with osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis that generally affects the hands, hips and knees.

In the study published in the journal Rheumatology, the researchers examined the link between diet and the effective self-management of osteoarthritis.

Analysing 68 previous studies in the field, they found that a low-dose supplement of fish oil (one and a half standard capsulTo Reduce es) could result in pain reduction for patients with osteoarthritis and help improve their cardiovascular health.

Essential fatty acids in fish oil reduce inflammation in joints, helping to alleviate pain, the study said.

An increase in foods rich in vitamin K such as kale, spinach and parsley was also found to deliver benefits to patients with osteoarthritis.

Vitamin K is needed for vitamin-K-dependent (VKD) proteins, which are found in bone and cartilage.

An increase in foods rich in vitamin K such as kale, spinach and parsley was also found to deliver benefits to patients with osteoarthritis.
Fish Oil can help in reducing osteoarthritis pain, Pixabay

An inadequate intake of the vitamin adversely affects the working of the protein, affecting bone growth and repair and increasing the risk of osteoarthritis.

“The importance of a good diet and regular exercise should never be underestimated. Not only does it keep us fit and healthy, but as we have learned from this study, it can also lessen painful symptoms of osteoarthritis,” said study co-author Margaret Rayman, Professor at the University of Surrey in Britain.

“We are what we eat and it is important that we have the right amount of nutrients from our food to ensure that our body systems work as they should,” Rayman added.

The researchers also found that a reduction of weight for overweight and obese patients and the introduction of exercise tailored to mobility could also help ease the symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Also Read: Know The Benefits of Post-Workout Shower

Not only does obesity increase strain on joints, it can cause low-grade, systemic inflammation in the body aggravating the condition further.

A calorie restricted diet, combined with strengthening, flexibility and aerobic exercises, was identified as an effective approach in reducing pain in overweight patients.

There is no evidence that a calorie restricted diet does anything beneficial for lean patients with the condition, the study said. (IANS)

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Obesity And Smoking: Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease

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Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment
Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment, Pixabay

Obesity in women and smoking among men could be major factors behind not achieving remission in rheumatoid arthritis, despite early treatment, researchers say.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects a person’s joints, causing pain and disability and can also affect internal organs.

The study showed that though early identification and aggressive treatment improve arthritis outcomes, six per cent of women and 38 per cent of men did not achieve remission in the first year despite receiving guideline-based care.

“Our results suggest that lifestyle changes — smoking cessation in men and weight reduction in women — as well as optimising methotrexate use may facilitate rapid reduction of inflammation, an essential goal of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis,” said Susan Bartlett, professor of Medicine at McGill University in Canada.

The study, published in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, included 1,628 adults with an average age of 55.

The analysis highlighted that obesity more than doubled the likelihood of not achieving remission in women.

obesity
obesity, Pixabay

In men, current smoking was associated with 3.5 greater odds of not achieving remission within the first year.

Further, almost all patients within the study were initially treated with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs), with three quarters being treated with methotrexate.

Analysis demonstrated that not using methotrexate significantly increased the likelihood of not achieving remission in women by 28 per cent and in men by 45 per cent.

Also read: drug free compound can ease arthritis pain

“These results highlight the need to support physicians and empower patients to take advantage of the impact lifestyle changes can have on disease progression,” Johannes Bijlsma, President, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), said in a statement. (IANS)

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