Sunday December 8, 2019

Reduce Intake of ‘Ugly Cholesterol’ for Stroke Prevention: Researchers

The study’s findings point to the fact that prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke should not just focus on reducing the bad LDL cholesterol, but also on reducing remnant cholesterol and triglycerides, a type of fat

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Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of stroke, the researchers said. Pixabay

Reducing high levels of remnant cholesterol or ‘ugly cholesterol’ can significantly cut the risk of stroke and myocardial infarction, suggest researchers.

In a study, published in Atherosclerosis journal, the researchers from University of Copenhagen observed that levels of remnant cholesterol in the blood of adults are just as high as the amount of the “bad” LDL cholesterol.

There are three types of cholesterol found in the blood — remnant cholesterol or ‘ugly cholesterol’, LDL cholesterol or ‘bad cholesterol’ and HDL cholesterol or ‘good cholesterol’.

“Our results show that the amount of remnant cholesterol in the blood of adult Danes is just as high as the amount of the bad LDL cholesterol. We have previously shown that remnant cholesterol is at least as critical as LDL cholesterol in relation to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, and it is therefore a disturbing development,” said a Professor at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

The study’s findings are based on data from people from the Copenhagen General Population Study, a Danish population survey with a total of 140,000 participants.

Representational image.
Overweight people have better chances of survival from stroke. Pixabay

This study shows that remnant cholesterol may be more responsible than LDL cholesterol, the so-called ‘bad’ cholesterol, for cardiovascular diseases.

The researchers discovered that from the age of 20 until the age of 60, the amount of remnant cholesterol in the blood constantly increases, and for many people it remains at a high level for the rest of their lives.

“Previous studies from the Copenhagen General Population Study show that overweight and obesity are the main cause of the very high amount of remnant cholesterol in the blood of adult Danes. In addition, diabetes, hereditary genes and lack of exercise play a part,” said MD Mie Balling, one of the authors of the study.

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The study’s findings point to the fact that prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke should not just focus on reducing the bad LDL cholesterol, but also on reducing remnant cholesterol and triglycerides, a type of fat.

“So far, both cardiologists and GPs have focused mostly on reducing LDL cholesterol, but in the future, the focus will also be on reducing triglycerides and remnant cholesterol,” said Borge Nordestgaard, a Professor at the varsity. (IANS)

Next Story

Cancer Patients Are More Prone To Death From A Stroke: Study

One explanation for the increased risk could be that many people who are diagnosed with cancer are in a 'prothrombotic' state, which means they are more likely to form a blood clot

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Stroke
Additionally, they found that among those diagnosed with Cancer before they turned 40, most Stroke occurred in people treated for brain tumors and lymphomas. Pixabay

People living with Cancer are more than twice as likely to die of a stroke, compared to the general population say researchers, adding that the risk increases with time.

Cancers of the breast, prostate or colorectum were the type most commonly associated with fatal stroke, said the study published in the journal Nature Communications.

According the researchers, previous research has shown that most cancer patients aren’t going to die of their cancer, they are going to die of something else.

“A stroke is one possibility. Our findings suggest that patients may benefit from a screening program to help prevent some of these early deaths from stroke, as well as help identify which patients we could target with those preventative efforts,” said study researcher Nicholas Zaorsky, Assistant Professor at Penn State University in the US.

For the findings, the researchers used data gathered from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) programme.

SEER includes data about cancer incidence, survival, treatment and age and year of diagnosis, and covers 28 per cent of the US population.

They used SEER data on more than 7.2 million patients who had been diagnosed with invasive cancer — cancer that has spread beyond the tissue in which it originally developed — between 1992 and 2015.

The researchers found that out of 7,529,481 cancer patients, 80,513 died of a stroke.

Males and females had equal chances of dying from a stroke, but those diagnosed with cancer at a younger age had a higher chance of a fatal stroke.

Stroke
People living with Cancer are more than twice as likely to die of a Stroke, compared to the general population say researchers, adding that the risk increases with time. Pixabay

Additionally, they found that among those diagnosed with cancer before they turned 40, most strokes occurred in people treated for brain tumors and lymphomas.

In patients diagnosed with cancer above the age of 40, fatal strokes were most commonly associated with cancer of the prostate, breast and colorectum.

One explanation for the increased risk could be that many people who are diagnosed with cancer are in a ‘prothrombotic’ state, which means they are more likely to form a blood clot, Zaorsky said.

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“That blood clot may then go to the lungs and cause a pulmonary embolism, for example, or cause a stroke if it goes to the brain,” Zaorsky added.

The researchers added that future studies could help pinpoint mechanisms and further establish the relationship between cancer and strokes. (IANS)