Monday December 9, 2019

Refrain From Coffee if You Are Expecting, It Can Make Your Baby Obese

However, the clear link between caffeine and the cause of obesity is not yet proved, the study showed.

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Are you expecting? If so, refrain from drinking coffee, as babies born to women who drank coffee during pregnancy were found to be at a higher risk of being overweight, claims a study.
Coffee can make babies obese if taken by expecting mothers, Pixabay

Are you expecting? If so, refrain from drinking coffee, as babies born to women who drank coffee during pregnancy were found to be at a higher risk of being overweight, claims a study.

Consumption of even one or two cups of coffee per day by expectant mothers can put their babies into a higher risk of being obese at school age.

“There may be good cause to increase the restriction of the recommended maximum of three cups of coffee per day. Caffeine is not a medicine that needs to be consumed,” said Verena Sengpiel, Associate Professor at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden.

However, the clear link between caffeine and the cause of obesity is not yet proved, the study showed.

Consumption of even one or two cups of coffee per day by expectant mothers can put their babies into a higher risk of being obese at school age.
A Pregnant Woman, Pixabay

Published in BMJ Open Journal, the team included 50,943 expectant mothers. The children born to women who had consumed caffeine during pregnancy were studied till they were eight years old.

During the study, children aged five years old, who were overweight or obese were five per cent greater in the group whose mothers had the highest caffeine consumption in the study, compared to those whose mothers had the lowest caffeine consumption.

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The risk of child obesity due to prenatal caffeine consumption was also seen among women who followed the recommended amount as according to the National Food Agency, i.e. three cups of coffee every day.

Even though further studies are needed, it is better to reduce the consumption or completely refrain from caffeine intake during pregnancy, Sengpiel advised. (IANS)

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Most Pregnant Women Depend on Their Mothers For Guidance: Study

The researchers performed in-depth interviews with pregnant women and their mothers while following the pregnant women for nine months

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Pregnant Women
The study also found that Pregnant Women with higher education still found a great value in what their mothers could tell them about how their bodies would be changing and were a valuable source for details related to their familial or genetic inheritance -- information that only their mothers could contribute. Pixabay

Most Pregnant Women still rely on their mothers for emotional support and guidance — many weighing mother’s advice as equal to or even over medical recommendation, a new study suggests.

For the study, published in the journal Reproduction, the research team from University of Cincinnati, investigated the complexities within mother-daughter dynamics during pregnancy in relation to potentially harmful advice from many pregnancy guidebooks, looking specifically at the emotional and health care risks to certain groups.

The researchers performed in-depth interviews with pregnant women and their mothers while following the pregnant women for nine months.

“I found that most pregnancy self-help books, best known for their month-by-month guidance on fetal development and lifestyle coaching, are also empathic about following medical advice exclusively over what they consider the outdated advice of a mother or friend,” said study researcher Danielle Bessett from University of Cincinnati.

“This advice is limited and can result in an increased level of stress and discomfort for some soon-to-be moms,” Bessett added.

While looking at two groups — pregnant women with at least a bachelor’s degree and women with no college or higher education — Bessett found that all pregnant women took steps to have a healthy pregnancy.

But while the researcher identified a pervasive link to a mother’s influence on her daughter’s health and well-being in both groups, it was especially strong for minorities and women with less than a college degree who had little trust in their medical personnel.

Women with higher education engaged with their mothers in ways much more similar to how they are framed in common self-help books.

“Self-help books are giving us a really terrible picture of soon-to-be grandmothers that pregnant women themselves don’t really fully endorse regardless of who they are,” said Bessett.

“I argue that books are strictly endorsing medical guidance exclusively and that’s not the only place where women are getting their information,” Besset added.

 

Pregnant Women
Most Pregnant Women still rely on their mothers for emotional support and guidance — many weighing mother’s advice as equal to or even over medical recommendation, a new study suggests. Pixabay

While highly educated women engaged with their mothers in a more limited way, women with lower education engaged with their mothers more in-depth about everything and ranked their mothers as the most valuable source of information, the study said.

ALSO READ: Marine Animals Can Help Humans Monitor Oceans: Study

The study also found that women with higher education still found a great value in what their mothers could tell them about how their bodies would be changing and were a valuable source for details related to their familial or genetic inheritance — information that only their mothers could contribute.

“One of the most distinctive differences between the two groups showed how much more women with higher education valued how scientific information and modern technology could contribute to a healthy pregnancy,” said Bessett. (IANS)