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According to ISRO, the programme will be of two weeks duration during summer holidays (May 11-22, 2020) and the schedule will include invited talks, experience sharing by the eminent scientists, facility and lab visits, exclusive sessions for discussions with experts, practical and feedback sessions. Wikimedia Commons

Online registration for the Indian space agency’s young scientist programme ‘Yuva Vigyani Karyakram (Yuvika)’ closes at 6 p.m. on March 5, said the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

According to the ISRO, a total of 1,53,000 registrations have been made.


In a tweet on Tuesday, ISRO said: “Many thanks to our Honourable Prime Minister @narendramodi for mentioning ISRO’s #YUVIKA2020 (Young Scientist) Programme in ‘Mann Ki Baat’ on February 23, 2020, catapulting the registrations from 74,000 to 1,53,000! Registration closes at 6 p.m. on March 5, 2020.”

The space agency has launched the Young Scientist Programme last year and the second edition is scheduled to be held in May 2020.

The programme is primarily aimed at imparting basic knowledge on Space Technology, Space Science and Space Applications to the younger ones with the intent of arousing their interest in the emerging areas of space activities.

According to ISRO, the programme will be of two weeks duration during summer holidays (May 11-22, 2020) and the schedule will include invited talks, experience sharing by the eminent scientists, facility and lab visits, exclusive sessions for discussions with experts, practical and feedback sessions.


The space agency has launched the Young Scientist Programme last year and the second edition is scheduled to be held in May 2020. Wikimedia Commons

Three students each from each State/Union Territory will be selected to participate in this programme covering the CBSE, ICSE and State syllabus. Five additional seats are reserved for overseas citizens of India (OCI) candidates across the country.

Those who have finished Class 8 and studying in Class 9 (in the academic year 2019-20) will be eligible for the programme.

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The selection is based on the Class 8 academic performance and extracurricular activities. (IANS)


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