Saturday August 24, 2019

Experts: Regulating Salt Intake Key to Prevent Hypertension

Besides affecting the heart and fertility, hypertension can affect the skin too, the health experts said

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Experts: Regulating Salt Intake Key to Prevent Hypertension

Regulating salt consumption is key to prevent hypertension, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, heart attack, stroke and heart failure, say experts.

Hypertension, also known as high or raised blood pressure, is a condition in which the blood vessels have persistently raised pressure.

To lower the risk of heart disease, adults should reduce sodium intake to less than 2 grams a day, or the equivalent of about one teaspoon of table salt, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

“Hypertension can lead to cardiovascular diseases. The rise in blood pressure caused by eating too much salt may damage the arteries leading to the heart,” Vijay D’Silva, Director at the Asian Heart Institute, said in statement.

According to a recent study, published in the journal Hypertension, about half of adults living in Asia are suffering from the high blood pressure.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

While lifestyle factors, including diet and stress, are behind the high hypertension rates in Asia, one common problem is high salt intake, the study showed.

Asians not only tend to have diets high in sodium, but they are genetically more sensitive to sodium, the researchers said.

“Raised blood pressure due to high salt consumption is the biggest single contributing risk factor for non-communicable diseases and damage to your kidney,” explained Bhupendra Gandhi of the NGO Amar Gandhi Foundation.

Previously, it was believed that eating high amounts of fruit and vegetables might help counteract the effect of high salt on blood pressure.

Also Read: Breastfeeding May Reduce Hypertension Risk

However, another study led by researchers from the Imperial College London and Northwestern University, showed that people eating higher amounts of salt had higher blood pressure — no matter how healthy a person’s overall diet.

Hypertension can also affect fertility in both males and females, says Rajalaxmi Walavalkar of Cocoon Fertility.

“Anyone with hypertension is at an increased risk of infertility. A high salt diet leading to high blood pressure can result in delayed puberty and even impact reproductive health,” Walavalkar noted.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Besides affecting the heart and fertility, hypertension can affect the skin too, the health experts said.

“High blood pressure can harden your arteries, which decreases the flow of blood and oxygen. An impairment of the flow of oxygen, to an organ such as your face, can cause your skin to dry and wrinkles faster which can make one look less youthful,” said Amit Karkhanis – Medical Cosmetologist and founder of Dr Tvacha clinic.

Hypertension is also known to cause trouble sleeping which leads to signs of premature ageing (fine lines, uneven pigmentation and reduced elasticity).

Reducing salt consumption in everyday life, including fried foods, processed foods, can not only curb the problem of hypertension but also save multiple organs from damage and pave way for a healthy life. (IANS)

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Study: Air Pollution Linked to Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension and Cardiovascular Diseases

Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of cardiovascular diseases, the researchers said

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air pollution, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension
Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of stroke, the researchers said. Pixabay

People who are exposed to high pollution levels are at significantly higher risk of suffering from hypertension, metabolic syndrome and heart diseases, says a new study.

In the study, published in Journal of Public Health, the researchers investigated the associations between a long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and residential distance to green spaces and major roads with the development of hypertension and metabolic syndrome components such as a high triglyceride level, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, higher blood glucose, and obesity.

Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of cardiovascular diseases, the researchers said. The study’s findings showed that air pollution levels above the median are associated with a higher risk of reduced high density lipoprotein.

air pollution, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension
The study’s findings showed that air pollution levels above the median are associated with a higher risk of reduced high density lipoprotein. VOA

Traffic-related exposure was associated with the incidence of hypertension, higher triglyceride level and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the negative impact of traffic air pollutants was observed only in the participants who lived in multifamily buildings.

ALSO READ: Paris to Restrict Car Use as a Measure to Fight Against Surging Air Pollution

The researchers also found positive effects of the natural environment, and have emphasized the positive impact of such spaces on cardiovascular health.

“Our research results enable us to say that we should regulate as much as possible the living space for one person in multifamily houses, improve the noise insulation of apartments, and promote the development of green spaces in multifamily houses” said study’s lead author Agn Brazien. (IANS)