Saturday December 7, 2019

Experts: Regulating Salt Intake Key to Prevent Hypertension

Besides affecting the heart and fertility, hypertension can affect the skin too, the health experts said

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Experts: Regulating Salt Intake Key to Prevent Hypertension

Regulating salt consumption is key to prevent hypertension, which is associated with an increased risk of heart disease, heart attack, stroke and heart failure, say experts.

Hypertension, also known as high or raised blood pressure, is a condition in which the blood vessels have persistently raised pressure.

To lower the risk of heart disease, adults should reduce sodium intake to less than 2 grams a day, or the equivalent of about one teaspoon of table salt, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

“Hypertension can lead to cardiovascular diseases. The rise in blood pressure caused by eating too much salt may damage the arteries leading to the heart,” Vijay D’Silva, Director at the Asian Heart Institute, said in statement.

According to a recent study, published in the journal Hypertension, about half of adults living in Asia are suffering from the high blood pressure.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

While lifestyle factors, including diet and stress, are behind the high hypertension rates in Asia, one common problem is high salt intake, the study showed.

Asians not only tend to have diets high in sodium, but they are genetically more sensitive to sodium, the researchers said.

“Raised blood pressure due to high salt consumption is the biggest single contributing risk factor for non-communicable diseases and damage to your kidney,” explained Bhupendra Gandhi of the NGO Amar Gandhi Foundation.

Previously, it was believed that eating high amounts of fruit and vegetables might help counteract the effect of high salt on blood pressure.

Also Read: Breastfeeding May Reduce Hypertension Risk

However, another study led by researchers from the Imperial College London and Northwestern University, showed that people eating higher amounts of salt had higher blood pressure — no matter how healthy a person’s overall diet.

Hypertension can also affect fertility in both males and females, says Rajalaxmi Walavalkar of Cocoon Fertility.

“Anyone with hypertension is at an increased risk of infertility. A high salt diet leading to high blood pressure can result in delayed puberty and even impact reproductive health,” Walavalkar noted.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Besides affecting the heart and fertility, hypertension can affect the skin too, the health experts said.

“High blood pressure can harden your arteries, which decreases the flow of blood and oxygen. An impairment of the flow of oxygen, to an organ such as your face, can cause your skin to dry and wrinkles faster which can make one look less youthful,” said Amit Karkhanis – Medical Cosmetologist and founder of Dr Tvacha clinic.

Hypertension is also known to cause trouble sleeping which leads to signs of premature ageing (fine lines, uneven pigmentation and reduced elasticity).

Reducing salt consumption in everyday life, including fried foods, processed foods, can not only curb the problem of hypertension but also save multiple organs from damage and pave way for a healthy life. (IANS)

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High Fibre Diet Can Cut The Risk of Diabetes, Hypertension: Study

The researchers found a high fibre diet is inversely related to cardiovascular risk factors and plays a protective role against cardiovascular disease

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Fibre Diet
According to guidelines from the National Institute of Nutrition and the Indian Council of Medical Research, the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for Fibre Diet is 40gm/2000kcal. Pixabay

Indian researchers have found that patients with hypertension and Type 2 diabetes who consumed a high Fibre diet witnessed an improvement in their blood pressure, cholesterol and fasting glucose.

For the study, the research team from Care Well Heart and Super Specialty Hospital in Amritsar, investigated the relationship between a high fibre diet and its impact on cardiovascular disease risk factors.

“Comprehensive evaluation of etiological effects of dietary factors on cardiometabolic outcomes, their quantitative effects and corresponding optimal intakes are well-established,” said the study’s lead author Rohit Kapoor.

According to guidelines from the National Institute of Nutrition and the Indian Council of Medical Research, the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for dietary fibre is 40gm/2000kcal.

Patients in this study had Type 2 diabetes and a calorie intake of 1,200-1,500kcal, causing their RDA for fibre to be 24-30gm.

The fibre intake of these patients was increased up to 20 to 25 per cent from the recommended allowances for them to be consuming a high fibre diet.

The study tracked 200 participants’ fibre intake for six months and included check-ups at the start of the study, three months and six months.

Participants were provided with diet prescriptions, which included detailed lists of different food groups with portion sizes in regional languages.

Fibre Diet
Indian researchers have found that patients with hypertension and Type 2 diabetes who consumed a high Fibre Diet witnessed an improvement in their blood pressure, cholesterol and fasting glucose. Pixabay

The researchers tracked participants’ fibre intake several ways, including having patients send photos of their meals on WhatsApp, which not only helped in knowing their fibre intake but also helped approximate portion sizes, and telephone calls three times a week during which detailed dietary recall was taken.

Participants on a high fibre diet experienced significant improvement in several cardiovascular risk factors, including a nine per cent reduction in serum cholesterol, 23 per cent reduction in triglycerides, 15 per cent reduction of systolic blood pressure and a 28 per cent reduction of fasting glucose.

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The researchers found a high fibre diet is inversely related to cardiovascular risk factors and plays a protective role against cardiovascular disease. (IANS)