Thursday March 21, 2019

Remain healthy during winter with these healthy tips

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Remain healthy during winter with these healthy tips
Remain healthy during winter with these healthy tips. wikimedia commons

New Delhi, Dec 28, 2017: The onset of winters can prove to be a health hazard if you are not following a nutritious diet, and a balanced lifestyle. So make sure you are getting right nutrition this chilly season.

Noorul Ameen, Naturopathy Physician at Organic India, lists down some tips to stay fit and enjoy the chilly season:

* Turning to organic honey to boost immunity: Organic honey is nature’s nectar that not just tickles your taste buds but also contains several vitamins, minerals and antioxidants to boost immunity levels to deal with winter allergies.

* Adding a few drops of Apple Cider Vinegar for body detoxing and blood purifying: Apple Cider Vinegar is a wonder liquid which works both for beauty and health. It has properties which can ease your sinus issues during the cold season, give lustre to your limp dry hair which falls under the stress of winter pollution and also can enliven your skin if taken with water in the morning.

* Sipping Tulsi Tea for antioxidants and other nutrients: Colder months are closely associated with lowered immunity which in turn increases your chances of contracting the flu. Tulsi (Holy Basil) enhances your immune system to fight the viruses. It also improves the body’s overall defence mechanism, reduces stress, improves stamina, boosts immunity, fights and prevents chronic disease, and provides a rich supply of antioxidant and other nutrients.

* Organic Coconut Oil to fight dry skin: Another common issue we all face is the dry, flaky skin caused by cold breeze and dehydration in winter months. The best all round elixir is organic virgin coconut oil. When applied externally, coconut oil keeps the skin moisturised, prevents dry scaly skin and strengthens the connective tissue under the skin. With its anti-microbial properties, skin stays healthy and nourished. Stay hydrated in winter months to make sure your skin stays healthy.

* Organic ghee to keep your body warm: Including organic ghee in your diet is one of the best ways to keep your body warm and it helps additionally in dealing with winter dryness of the skin.

Raghubansh Singh, Senior Ayurvedic Physician at Ananda in the Himalayas, too has some Ayurvedic tips to keep your skin plumped, oiled and glowing in the winter season

* Get in the habit of “oiling up” each morning with the ayurvedic self-massage “abhyanga” before your bath or shower. This will lubricate and protect your skin and give your complexion a radiant sheen that lasts throughout the day.

* Be sure to drink plenty of water each day. Rather than cold or iced (which aggravates Vata), drink your water warm, or at least at room temperature.

* Include oil-rich foods in your daily diet. Nuts (especially walnuts and blanched almonds); ground flaxseeds; sunflower, pumpkin seeds; olive oil; ghee in small amounts; and green leafy vegetables (they contain omega 3’s and help purify the skin and liver).

* Use herbs like Amla, Aloe vera, Shunthi, Manjishtha, Anantamool, Triphala, Chandan, which have gentle detoxifying properties and also help to maintain perfect moisturising balance. (IANS)

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Researchers Identify Climate-friendly Diets Are Also Healthier

"We can have both. We can have healthier diets and reduce our food-related emissions. And it doesn't require the extreme of eliminating foods entirely," Rose said.

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The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons
The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons

After examining the carbon footprint of what more than 16,000 Americans eat in a day, researchers have identified that more climate-friendly diets are also healthier, according to a study.

“People whose diets had a lower carbon footprint were eating less red meat and dairy — which contribute to a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions and are high in saturated fat — and consuming more healthy foods like poultry, whole grains and plant-based proteins,” said lead author Diego Rose from the Tulane University in New Orleans.

For the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers built an extensive database of the greenhouse gas emissions related to the production of foods and linked it to a large federal survey that asked people what they ate over a 24-hour period.

They ranked diets by the amount of greenhouse gas emissions per 1,000 calories consumed and divided them into five equal groups.

Then they rated the nutritional value of foods consumed in each diet using the US Healthy Eating Index, a federal measure of diet quality, and compared the lowest to the highest-impact groups on this and other measures.

Americans in the lowest carbon footprint group ate a healthier diet, as measured by this index. However, these diets also contained more of some low-emission items that aren’t healthy, namely added sugars and refined grains.

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Climate-friendly diets are also healthier: Study. Flickr

They also had lower amounts of important nutrients — such as iron, calcium, and vitamin D — likely because of the lower intakes of meat and dairy.

According to the researcher, overall, diets in the lowest impact group were healthier, but not on all measures. This is because diets are complex with many ingredients that each influence nutritional quality and environmental impacts.

Diets in the highest impact group accounted for five times the emissions of those in the lowest impact group. The highest impact diets had greater quantities of meat (beef, veal, pork and game), dairy and solid fats per 1000 calories than the low-impact diets.

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“We can have both. We can have healthier diets and reduce our food-related emissions. And it doesn’t require the extreme of eliminating foods entirely,” Rose said.

“For example, if we reduce the amount of red meat in our diets, and replace it with other protein foods such as chicken, eggs, or beans, we could reduce our carbon footprint and improve our health at the same time.” (IANS)