Tuesday September 17, 2019

Remembering Your Partner Can Help You Keep Your BP Down

If replicated, the findings could have implications for those facing everyday stressful situations, the researchers added

0
//
blood pressure
BP-monitoring machine. Pixabay

Having a romantic partner present — even in your mind — can help you keep blood pressure down in daily stressful situations, say researchers.

When faced with a stressful situation, thinking about your romantic partner may help keep blood pressure under control just as effectively as actually having your significant other in the room with you, according to a study by University of Arizona psychologists.

“This suggests that one way being in a romantic relationship might support people’s health is through allowing people to better cope with stress and lower levels of cardiovascular reactivity to stress across the day,” said psychology doctoral student Kyle Bourassa.

Night-owl women not for long-term relationships: Study
In stress? Remember your romantic partner and keep BP down. pixabay

“It appears that thinking of your partner as a source of support can be just as powerful as actually having them present,” Bourassa added.

For the study, published in the journal Psychophysiology, 102 participants were asked to complete a stressful task — submerging one foot into 3 inches of cold water ranging from 38 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

Researchers measured participants’ blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate variability before, during and after the task.

The participants, all of whom were in committed romantic relationships, either had their significant other sitting quietly in the room with them during the task or they were instructed to think about their romantic partner as a source of support during the task. In third scenario, they were instructed to think about their day during the task.

Blood Pressure
Representational image. Flickr

The effect on blood pressure reactivity was just as powerful whether the partner was physically present or merely conjured mentally.

“The findings may help explain, in part, why high-quality romantic relationships are consistently associated with positive health outcomes in the scientific literature,” said Bourassa.

Also Read- Microsoft Office 365 Now Available on Apple Mac

If replicated, the findings could have implications for those facing everyday stressful situations, the researchers added. (IANS)

Next Story

Rate of Blood Pressure among Pregnant Women Aged 35 and Over in US Increases by More than 75%

Women are having children later than in the 1970s and 1980s - and are experiencing higher rates of hypertension during pregnancy as a result

0
Blood Pressure, Pregnant, Women
In the study, published in the journal Hypertension, researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 151 million women in the US between 1970-2010. Pixabay

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that the rate of blood pressure (chronic hypertension) among pregnant women aged 35 and over in the US has increased by more than 75 per cent since 1970, according to a new research.

In the study, published in the journal Hypertension, researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 151 million women in the US between 1970-2010.

“Women are having children later than in the 1970s and 1980s – and are experiencing higher rates of hypertension during pregnancy as a result,” said the study led by author and Indian origin researcher Cande V. Ananth from Rutgers University.

According to the researchers, advanced maternal age was associated with the increase, with the rate of chronic hypertension increasing on an average by six per cent per year, 13 times what it was in 1970.

Blood Pressure, Pregnant, Women
Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that the rate of blood pressure (chronic hypertension) among pregnant women aged 35 and over in the US has increased. Pixabay

Prior research has shown that compared with white women, black women have higher rates of obesity, are more likely to smoke and use drugs and are at greater social disadvantage, all of which may contribute to an increased risk of chronic hypertension.

“The best outcome would be to control hypertension before becoming pregnant by reducing obesity, quitting smoking, adopting an overall healthier lifestyle before and during pregnancy, and treating high blood pressure effectively. For every 1-2 lbs. lost prior to pregnancy, blood pressure is reduced,” Ananth said.

Also Read- Reducing Orbit of Chandrayaan-2 Orbiter to Pick Up Any Weak Signals is a Dangerous Move

“Not only do these findings have implications for the health of the women and newborns during pregnancy, they have lasting implications on future risks of cardiovascular and stroke risks in women later in life,” he added. (IANS)