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Reminding your Kids “Life has Various Roles to Play” Leads to Better Problem Solving and More Flexible Thinking in Them

"This is some of the first research on reminding kids about their multi-faceted selves," said the study lead author Sarah Gaither

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It is the duty of the parents that they should make their kids understand the various relationships they share with the other people in their life. Pixabay

Reminding your kid that he or she has various roles to play in life such as son, daughter, friend, reader or helper can lead to better problem-solving and more flexible thinking in them.

Researchers from Duke University in the US have found that reminding children of their many identities also showed more flexible thinking in them about race and other social groupings — a behaviour that could be valuable in an increasingly diverse society.

“This is some of the first research on reminding kids about their multi-faceted selves,” said the study lead author Sarah Gaither. Children who were reminded of their multiple roles also showed more flexible thinking about social groupings, said the study published in the journal Developmental Science.

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Children who were reminded of their multiple roles also showed more flexible thinking about social groupings, said the study published in the journal Developmental Science. Pixabay

According to Shweta Sharma, Consultant Clinical Psychologist at Columbia Asia Hospital in Ghaziabad, it’s great that such research has come out to remind kids about their multi-faceted selves apart from just being the pampered son or daughter of a family.

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“It is the duty of the parents that they should make their kids understand the various relationships they share with the other people in their life. That not only makes them a responsible individual but also helps them to boost their problem-solving skills,” Sharma told IANS.

It also helps them expand their life and thought the process that will help them to form a simple, non-judgmental mindset. “This practice of introducing kids to their various roles also broadens their horizon. They try to look at things in a new perspective, which isn’t fixed by the society,” she added. (IANS)

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Family Conflict may Influence Suicidal Thoughts in Kids: Study

Parents, caregivers and people working with children should be aware of the possibility that a 9-year-old is thinking about suicide, Barch said

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The researchers said that the evidence was particularly strong for the suicide risk link, but the effect was smaller than for depression. Lifetime Stock

Family conflict and parental monitoring are significant predictors of suicidal thoughts in children as young as 9- and 10-year olds, says a study.

The majority of children surveyed in the study had caregivers who either did not know, or did not report, the suicidal thoughts of the children in their charge.

Historically, the belief has been that people don’t need to ask kids about suicidal thoughts before adolescence, said Deanna Barch, Professor at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, US.

“Our data suggests that’s absolutely not true. Kids are having these thoughts. They’re not at the same rates as adults, but they are nontrivial,” she added.

The study, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, looked at 11,814 children between ages 9 and 10 from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study, a longitudinal study in the US on adolescent brain health in which caretakers also participate.

Dividing suicidal thoughts and actions into several categories, researchers found that 2.4 to 6.2 per cent of the children reported having thoughts about suicide, from wishing they were dead to devising — but not carrying out — a plan.

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Mother-daughter conflict ups suicide risk in abused teen girls: Study. Pixabay

When it came to actions, they saw 0.9 per cent of these 9- and -10-year-olds said they had tried to commit suicide; 9.1 per cent reported non-suicidal self-injury.

In more than 75 per cent of cases where children self-reported suicidal thoughts or behaviours, the caregivers did not know about the child’s experience, said the study.

The researchers found that family conflict was a predictor of suicidal thoughts and non-suicidal self-injury. Monitoring by a caretaker was also predictive of those measures, as well as suicide attempts.

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Parents, caregivers and people working with children should be aware of the possibility that a 9-year-old is thinking about suicide, Barch said.

“If you have kids who are distressed in some way, you should be asking about this,” she said, adding that caregivers can help identify kids who might be in trouble. (IANS)