Tuesday January 21, 2020

Removal of Gallblader During Pregnancy May Spike Up Risk of Preterm Delivery

Also, women who underwent the operation during the third trimester were twice as likely to deliver a preterm baby and almost twice as likely to have abnormal maternal outcomes

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Technology, Privacy
A model wears the Owlet Band pregnancy monitor at the Owlet booth at CES International, Jan. 9, 2019, in Las Vegas. The device can track fetal heart rate, kicks and contractions. VOA

Getting The gallbladder removed during pregnancy may increase the risk of preterm delivery and hospital re-admissions among others, researchers said.

Also, women whose gallbladder has been removed during pregnancy are more likely to experience longer hospital stays than those who delay the operation until after childbirth.

As pregnant women produce extra progesterone, the risk of development of gallstones increases. When these stones become problematic, causing extreme pain, a surgeon may recommend removal of gallbladder by performing cholecystectomy, a type of surgery.

But women who postponed cholecystectomy until after childbirth had better maternal outcomes.

“In light of these findings, whenever possible, women with symptomatic gallstones during pregnancy should wait as long as possible to let the baby mature before having cholecystectomy,” said Henry A. Pitt, Professor at Temple University in the US.

Pregnant Women
Lady with her baby. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers compared 403 pregnant women who underwent the operation within 90 days prior to childbirth with 17,490 women who had the procedure within three months after childbirth.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, showed that maternal delivery outcomes, including eclampsia and haemorrhage for the mother, and preterm delivery were significantly worse when cholecystectomy was done during pregnancy as opposed to postpartum.

Eclampsia is a potentially dangerous pregnancy complication characterised by high blood pressure. The eclampsia rate for pregnant women who underwent cholecystectomy in the third trimester was one per cent higher than those who chose to wait until after childbirth.

Also Read- New Software Can Spot Potentially Lethal Heart Diseases

Additionally, the haemorrhage and preterm delivery rates for women who had the cholecystectomy during pregnancy was three per cent and 12 per cent higher, respectively.

Also, women who underwent the operation during the third trimester were twice as likely to deliver a preterm baby and almost twice as likely to have abnormal maternal outcomes. (IANS)

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Over 95% Women Feel That Abortion Was The Right Decision: Study

Over 95% women do not regret having an abortion says a new study

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women abortion
According to a new study, over 95% women do not regret the decision of having an abortion. Pixabay

Researchers have found that even five years down the line after having an abortion, over 95 per cent of the women said it was the right decision for them.

Published in the journal Social Science & Medicine, the study found no evidence that women began to regret their decisions as years passed.

On the contrary, the women reported that both their positive and negative feelings about the abortion diminished over time. At five years, the overwhelming majority (84 per cent) had either positive feelings, or none at all.

“Even if they had difficulty making the decision initially, or if they felt their community would not approve, our research shows that the overwhelming majority of women who obtain abortions continue to believe it was the right decision,” said study researcher Corinne Rocca, Associate Professor at University of California in the US.

“This debunks the idea that most women suffer emotionally from having an abortion,” Rocca added.

abortion
Most women suffer emotionally from having an abortion. Pixabay

For the findings, the researchers analysed data from the Turnaway Study, a five-year effort to understand the health and socioeconomic consequences for nearly 1,000 women who sought abortions in 21 states around the country.

The analysis included 667 participants who had abortions at the start of the study. The women were surveyed a week after they sought care and every six months thereafter, for a total of 11 times.

While women did not report regretting their decision, many did struggle initially to make it. Just over half said the decision to terminate their pregnancy was very difficult (27 per cent) or somewhat difficult (27 pe rcent), while the rest (46 percent) said it was not difficult.

About 70 per cent also reported feeling they would be stigmatised by their communities if people knew they had sought an abortion, with 29 per cent reporting low levels and 31 percent reporting high levels of community stigma. Those who struggled with their decisions or felt stigmatized were more likely to experience sadness, guilt and anger shortly after obtaining the abortion.

Over time, however, the number of women reporting these negative emotions declined dramatically, particularly in the first year after their abortion. This was also true for those who initially struggled with their decision.

And relief was the most prominent emotion reported by all groups at the end of the study — just as it was at every time point in the study.

Also Read- Guide Yourself on a Path of Self-Discovery this New Year

“This research goes further than previous studies, in that it follows women for longer, and was conducted on a larger sample from many different clinics throughout the US,” said Julia Steinberg from University of Maryland.

“It shows that women remain certain in their decision to get an abortion over time. These results clearly disprove claims that regret is likely after abortion,” Steinberg said. (IANS)