Wednesday October 16, 2019

Replace Animal Protein in Diet with Crickets, Ants, Cockroaches, Beetles and Other Insects

The United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has counted more than 1,900 insect species that are edible

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Animal, Protein, Diet
Gabriela Soto prepares insects for lunch, while her husband biologist Federico Paniagua (unseen) promotes the ingestion of a wide variety of insects as a low-cost and nutrient-rich food, in Grecia, Costa Rica, July 13, 2019. VOA

At his home in rural Costa Rica, biologist Federico Paniagua joined his family at the dining table to devour several types of insects that he raised on his farm and whose flavor he compares to potato chips. Animal.

The head of the University of Costa Rica’s Insects Museum decided three years ago to replace animal protein in his diet with crickets, ants, cockroaches, beetles and other insects – and wants to encourage others to do the same.

“Insects are delicious,” he said in an interview at his farm in Sarchi, about 30 miles (50 km) from the capital San Jose.

“You can sit and watch a soap opera, watch the football game, do any activity with a plate full of insects. Eat them one by one, with a glass of soda… they’ll go down well,” said Paniagua.

Animal, Protein, Diet
Biologist Federico Paniagua eats a cricket during lunch while promoting the ingestion of a wide variety of insects as a low-cost and nutrient-rich food, in Grecia, Costa Rica, July 13, 2019. VOA

The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has counted more than 1,900 insect species that are edible.

Especially in Asia and in Africa, the tiny creatures are touted as delicacies packed with vitamins, minerals and energy.

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Their proponents also note that bugs emit fewer greenhouse gases and less ammonia than cattle or pigs and require significantly less land and water than cattle.

Paniagua’s wife, Gabriela Soto, prepared their meal by splashing oil in a frying pan, adding the farm-raised insects and topping them off with a dash of salt.

Animal, Protein, Diet
An African cockroach is pictured in the insect farm for human consumption of the biologist Federico Paniagua, as he is promoting the ingestion of a wide variety of insects, as a low-cost and nutrient-rich food in Grecia, Costa Rica, June 22, 2019. VOA

She then brought out several dishes to her young daughter, who reached into a plate with her hands and munched fearlessly, and husband, who suggested a bit of lemon would enhance their flavor.

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“They are going to taste like potato chips… you can eat basically a whole plate of these insects,” Paniagua said. (VOA)

Next Story

Increased Stress and Poor Dietary Habits can Cause Acne

Study identifies the most important factors relating to Acne

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Acne
Study shows that Poor dietary habits, increased stress and harsh skincare routines are among the most significant factors associated with Acne. Pixabay

Poor dietary habits, increased stress and harsh skincare routines were among the most significant factors associated with acne, according to a study.

The research presented at the 28th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress in Madrid evaluated the exposure to different worsening factors on acne on more than 6,700 participants across six countries.

“For the first time, this study allows us to identify the most important exposome factors relating to acne from patient questioning prior to any treatment prescription,” said the study’s lead researcher Brigitte Dreno from the University Hospital of Nantes in France.

Acne
Healthy and Balanced dietary habits can reduce the chances of Skin becoming Acne Prone. Pixabay

The results showed that significantly more individuals with acne (48.2 per cent) consumed dairy products daily compared to individuals who did not (38.8 per cent).

The difference was also statistically significant for soda juices or syrups (35.6 per cent vs 31 per cent), pastries and chocolate (37 per cent vs 27.8 per cent) and sweets (29.7 per cent vs 19.1 per cent).

Surprisingly 11 per cent of acne sufferers consume whey proteins versus 7 per cent without acne and 11.9 per cent of acne sufferers consume anabolic steroids versus 3.2 per cent without acne.

Acne
Study found that harsh skincare habits were more common in Acne sufferers. Pixabay

Exposure to pollution or stress was also more frequently observed in participants with acne compared to control participants.

The research also found that harsh skincare practices were more common in acne sufferers.

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Tobacco, which has previously been showed as a potential acne trigger, was not shown to have an influence, the study said. (IANS)