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Report: China Developing Advanced Lunar Mission Spaceship

China's Shenzhou space capsule used on all six of its crewed missions is based on Russia's Soyuz and is capable of carrying three astronauts in its re-entry module

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FILE - The supermoon, rises over a logo for AVIC or Aviation Industry Corp in Beijing, China, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016.
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China is developing an advanced new spaceship capable of both flying in low-Earth orbit and landing on the moon, according to state media, in another bold step for a space program that equaled the U.S. in number of rocket launches last year.

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The newspaper Science and Technology Daily cited spaceship engineer Zhang Bainian as saying the new craft would be recoverable and have room for multiple astronauts. While no other details were given in the Tuesday report, Zhang raised as a comparison the Orion spacecraft being developed by NASA and the European Space Agency. The agency hopes Orion will carry astronauts into space by 2023.

China’s Shenzhou space capsule used on all six of its crewed missions is based on Russia’s Soyuz and is capable of carrying three astronauts in its re-entry module.

China came late to crewed space flight, launching its first man into space in 2003, but has advanced rapidly since then. In its most recent crewed mission, two astronauts spent a month aboard a Chinese space station late last year.

A fully functioning, permanently crewed space station is on course to begin operations in around five years and a manned lunar mission has been suggested for the future.

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Now firmly established among the big three in space travel, China last year moved ahead of Russia for the first time in number of rocket launches and equaled the United States at 22, according to Harvard University astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell. Russia had 17 launches, while the U.S. might have had several more if Space X’s Falcon 9 rocket fleet hadn’t been grounded following a Sept. 1 launchpad explosion. (VOA)

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NASA Launches Interactive Website Letting Users Explore In What Ways Space Technology Impacts Their Everyday Life

The US agency's collaboration with commercial companies has helped bring space technology back to Earth for over 50 years

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NASA's new website shows how space tech impacts people's day-to-day lives. Flickr

NASA has launched a new interactive website that lets users explore how space technology impacts everyday life on Earth.

The new website, called NASA Home and City, features about 130 spinoff technologies in a virtual space, allowing users to tour through buildings and rooms to discover common items that NASA inspired or helped improve, the agency said in a statement on Tuesday.

These spinoffs are commercial products that apply NASA technology originally developed for studying and exploring space.

“Introducing NASA Home and City! A brand new interactive website where you can explore all the ways NASA benefits you in your daily life,” NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, said in a tweet.

“From GPS to airplanes, from baby formula to the camera in your phone, NASA technology is all around you!” he added.

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This is NASA’s Latest innovation. Pixabay

The US agency’s collaboration with commercial companies has helped bring space technology back to Earth for over 50 years.

These range from water filtration systems, originally designed to purify water for the Apollo astronauts to durable wind turbines, designed with Mars in mind to the selfie taking camera, the report said.

Also read- Apple CEO Tim Cook: “New iPhones Worth The Cost”

“Our space technology continues to improve life on Earth,” said Jim Reuter, the acting associate administrator of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate.

“NASA Home and City is a place of discovery for people, and especially students, who have ever wondered why space exploration should matter to them,” Reuter noted. (IANS)