Sunday July 21, 2019

Research Finds, Inhalation Improves Brain Performance

The sense of smell is the earliest sense of mammals and is therefore believed to be an initial pattern for all brain development

0
//
brain
The sense of smell is the earliest sense of mammals and is therefore believed to be an initial pattern for all brain development. Pixabay

Israeli research has found that inhalation improves brain performance, the Weizmann Institute of Science (WIS) in Israel reported.

The research, published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, found that the success rate of subjects who solved questions during inhalation was higher than their success during exhalation, Xinhua news agency reported.

The research results may lead to better learning methods and even help people who suffer from ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) by influencing the nature and pace of their breathing.

brain
The research results may lead to better learning methods and even help people who suffer from ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) by influencing the nature and pace of their breathing. Pixabay

The sense of smell is the earliest sense of mammals and is therefore believed to be an initial pattern for all brain development.

The WIS researchers hypothesized that the whole brain is coming to attention of processing information while inhaling, even when it comes to functions that have nothing to do with smell (“sniffing brain”).

First, the researchers measured the flow of air in the noses of subjects while solving math exercises, performing visual-spatial tasks and dealing with language tasks.

brain
First, the researchers measured the flow of air in the noses of subjects while solving math exercises, performing visual-spatial tasks and dealing with language tasks. Pixabay

The subjects were asked to press a button as soon as they were ready for the next exercise. It turned out that they tended to put air into their bodies in time for their readiness to deal with the next task.

ALSO READ: Smart Toilet Seats can Monitor Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

Then, in a visual-spatial task, half of the questions appeared during the subjects’ inhalation and the other half with exhalation. It was found that the success rates were significantly improved when solving questions while inhaling.

The researchers also measured the electrical activity in the subjects’ brains at rest and during taking tasks, and found in both cases that the connectivity between the brain areas was significantly different between inhalation and exhalation.

The researchers noted that the results have nothing to do with oxygen entering the body, as the effect on the brain in the experiments was immediate (about 0.2 seconds) (IANS)

Next Story

Being Overweight is not good for your Body and Brain, say Researchers

Researchers from the University of Arizona say having a high body mass index, or BMI, can cause inflammation that can impair cognitive functioning in older adults

0
body mass index
In this May 8, 2014 photo, an overweight man wears a shirt patterned after the American flag during a visit to the World Trade Center, in New York. VOA
  • “The higher your BMI, the more your inflammation goes up,” said Kyle Bourassa, lead author of the study, which is published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity
  • The researchers say their study adds to existing literature about inflammation and cognitive decline by showing BMI has a role to play
  • While cognitive decline is normal as one gets older, linking BMI to inflammation could help stave off the worst effects

October 19, 2016: Being overweight is not good for your body, and new research suggests it’s not good for your brain either. Researchers from the University of Arizona say having a high body mass index, or BMI, can cause inflammation that can impair cognitive functioning in older adults.

“The higher your BMI, the more your inflammation goes up,” said Kyle Bourassa, lead author of the study, which is published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity. “Prior research has found that inflammation, particularly in the brain, can negatively impact brain function and cognition.”

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The conclusions were reached using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging, which “includes over 12 years’ worth of information on the health, well-being and social and economic circumstances of the English population age 50 and older.”

[bctt tweet=”Obesity can affect the brain in a negative manner.” username=””]

They looked specifically at two groups over a six-year period.

“The higher participants’ body mass at the first time point in the study, the greater the change in their CRP levels over the next four years,” Bourassa said. “CRP stands for C-reactive protein, which is a marker in the blood of systemic inflammation in your body. Change in CRP over four years then predicted change in cognition six years after the start of the study. The body mass of these people predicted their cognitive decline through their levels of systemic inflammation.”

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

“The findings provide a clear and integrative account of how BMI is associated with cognitive decline through systemic inflammation, but we need to remember that these are only correlational findings,” he said. “Of course, correlation does not equal causation. The findings suggest a mechanistic pathway, but we cannot confirm causality until we reduce body mass experimentally, then examine the downstream effects on inflammation and cognition.”

While cognitive decline is normal as one gets older, linking BMI to inflammation could help stave off the worst effects.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

“If you have high inflammation, in the future we may suggest using anti-inflammatories not just to bring down your inflammation but to hopefully also help with your cognition,” Bourassa said. “Having a lower body mass is just good for you, period. It’s good for your health and good for your brain.” (VOA)