Thursday, July 9, 2020
Home Life Style Health & Fitness Research: Japan Scientists to Use 'Reprogrammed' Stem Cells to Fight Parkinson's

Research: Japan Scientists to Use ‘Reprogrammed’ Stem Cells to Fight Parkinson’s

The fact that the clinical trial uses iPS cells rather than human embryonic cells means the treatment would be acceptable in countries such as Ireland and much of Latin America, where embryonic cells are banned

Japanese scientists said Monday they will start clinical trials next month on a treatment for Parkinson’s disease, transplanting “reprogrammed” stem cells into brains, seeking a breakthrough in treating the neurodegenerative disorder.

Parkinson’s is caused by a lack of dopamine made by brain cells, and researchers have long hoped to use stem cells to restore normal production of the neurotransmitter chemical.

The clinical trials come after researchers at Japan’s Kyoto University successfully used human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) to restore functioning brain cells in monkeys last year.

So-called iPS cells are made by removing mature cells from an individual — often from the skin or blood — and reprogramming them to behave like embryonic stem cells. They can then be coaxed into dopamine-producing brain cells.

Parkinsons
Parkinson’s is caused by a lack of dopamine made by brain cells. (IANS)

“This will be the world’s first clinical trial using iPS cells on Parkinson’s disease,” Jun Takahashi, professor at Kyoto University’s Centre for iPS Cell Research and Application, told a news conference.

The center is headed by Shinya Yamanaka, who in 2012 shared a Nobel Prize for medicine with a British scientist, John Gurdon, for the discovery that adult cells can be transformed back into embryo-like cells.

Also Read: Boxing for Fitness Takes the Fight to Parkinson’s Disease

“We intend to carry on conducting our research carefully, yet expeditiously, in coordination with Kyoto University Hospital, so that new treatment using iPS cells will be brought to patients as soon as possible,” Yamanaka said in a statement.

The fact that the clinical trial uses iPS cells rather than human embryonic cells means the treatment would be acceptable in countries such as Ireland and much of Latin America, where embryonic cells are banned. (VOA)

STAY CONNECTED

18,993FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,781FollowersFollow

Most Popular

‘HotShots’, TikTok-like Short Video App by Ganna

Joining the short-video making app race, music streaming service Gaana on Wednesday launched HotShots - a platform to create and share short viral videos...

Foods that will Help Improve Your Sleep

There is a strong correlation between sleep quality and dietary patterns. High intake of confectionary and noodles was associated with poor sleep quality, whereas...

Here’s How Remdesivir Can Save Lives in Nations with Lower Hospital Capacity

Amid news that the US has bought up virtually the entire global supply of remdesivir, a new study outlines how the drug could save...

Instagram brings TikTok-like Feature to India

With the ban on TikTok creating a huge vacuum for the 15-second videos in the Indian Internet space, Facebook-owned Instagram on Wednesday announced the...

Smartphones not a Barrier to Parenting: Research

Parents may worry that spending time on their smartphones has a negative impact on their relationships with their children, however, a new study found...

Meditation Increases Immunity, says Research

Heartfulness meditation improves immunity against infections and cancer and is an effective adjunct in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders, a study said. In the...

Here Are Some Precautions to Take While Dining Out Amid Pandemic

There is some risk, but health officials say there are precautions you can take to minimize the chances you'll be exposed to the virus. Ordering...

High BP Medications May Also Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

Researchers have now claimed that medications commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure may also reduce patients' colorectal cancer risk. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-i)...

Recent Comments