Wednesday January 29, 2020

Resistance to Antibiotics Rise Among Indian Patients in Pace

There is increase in resistance to antibiotics including clarithromycin which is undoubtedly a worrisome situation in the country

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Antibiotics
In India, a huge population prefers to consume over-the-counter (OTC) drugs without even consulting a doctor. In the long run, this may make them resistant to most of the Antibiotics including clarithromycin. Pixabay

Resistance to commonly-used Antibiotics like clarithromycin is rising among Indian patients and that too at quite a fast pace, health experts have warned.

Clarithromycin is used to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections. This medication can also be used in combination with anti-ulcer medications to treat certain types of stomach ulcers.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security and development today.

Sunil Sofat, Additional Director, Department of Interventional Cardiology (Adult) at Jaypee Hospital in Noida, said that every antibiotic medicine has its own mechanism to treat diseases.

“Yes, this is true that the resistance to clarithromycin is rising among the Indian patients and that too at quite a fast pace. There are multiple factors for the same but one of the major reasons behind it is self-medication,” Sofat told IANS.

“In India, a huge population prefers to consume over-the-counter (OTC) drugs without even consulting a doctor. In the long run, this may make them resistant to most of the antibiotics including clarithromycin,” Sofat added.

Antibiotics
Resistance to commonly-used Antibiotics like clarithromycin is rising among Indian patients and that too at quite a fast pace, health experts have warned. Pixabay

In a recent study presented at United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week Barcelona 2019, researchers have found that resistance to clarithromycin, one of the most established antimicrobials used to eradicate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), had increased from 9.9 per cent in 1998 to 21.6 per cent last year, with increases in resistance also seen for levofloxacin and metronidazole.

The study, which analysed 1,232 patients from 18 countries across Europe, investigated resistance to antibiotics regularly taken for Helicobacter pylori infection, a harmful bacterium associated with gastric ulcers, lymphoma and gastric cancer.

According to Gaurav Jain, Senior Consultant, Internal Medicine at Dharamshila Narayana Superspeciality Hospital, New Delhi, antibiotic resistance is a major concern.

“In India the consumption of antibiotics without consulting a qualified physician is quite common which is leading to its resistance,” Jain told IANS.

“There is increase in resistance to antibiotics including clarithromycin which is undoubtedly a worrisome situation in the country,” Jain said.

However, Deepak Verma of Internal Medicine at Columbia Asia Hospital, Ghaziabad said: “Most of the cases that we see in India are connected to gram-negative bacteria such as e.coli that causes urinary tract infection (UTI).”

He added that the main causes for antibiotic resistance in India are its rampant misuse where people indulge in self-doctoring as well as taking medicines prescribed by unregistered medical practitioners, including quacks who suggest antibiotics quite indiscriminately.

Antibiotics
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), resistance to Antibiotics is one of the biggest threats to global health, food security and development today. Wikimedia Commons

“They primarily use antibiotics symptomatically which is not a correct method for all ailments — without blood and urine culture. Antibiotics can force the pathogen to develop resistance,” Verma explained.

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“Since the clinical culture in India is different from that of the western countries, the lack of awareness of the right process to prescribe antibiotics increases the chances of people using antibiotics without questioning,” he stressed. (IANS)

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Hiver Survey: More Than 60% Indian Millennials Feel Anxious About Unread Emails

Millennials across the globe today are increasingly getting hooked on to the practice of keeping their inbox empty/near-empty

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Millennials
More than 60 per cent millennials in India feel anxious when they see unread emails in their inbox. Pixabay

BY PUJA GUPTA

More than 60 per cent millennials in India feel anxious when they see unread emails in their inbox, reveals a survey.

The survey was conducted by Hiver with over 600 millennials in India to understand their work email behavior patterns.

Millennials across the globe today are increasingly getting hooked on to the practice of keeping their inbox empty/near-empty at all times – popularly known as eInbox Zero.’

Millennials
As many as 63 per cent millennials agreed that long emails hampered their workplace productivity. Pixabay

The survey also revealed that as many as two in five millennials get extremely uncomfortable if they haven’t been able to check their work email for three-four hours at a stretch.

When asked about the first app that they check on their phone upon waking up, 59 per cent chose WhatsApp, 29 per cent mentioned social media apps such as Instagram and Facebook, and only 9 per cent said emails.

Also Read- Here’s how Consuming High Fibre Diet Leads to Bloating

The findings also reveal some interesting insights on how emails affect employee productivity. As many as 63 per cent millennial agreed that long emails hampered their workplace productivity, and that they preferred them to be shorter and eto the point’. Another 60 per cent interestingly said that emails can be a good substitute for workplace meetings. (IANS)