Thursday December 12, 2019

Reverse Osmosis (RO) Plants be Set Up Only in Villages that Have Water Quality Problems

The study covered 21 gram panchayats (GPs), or village level local bodies, in seven states where the highest number of RO plants had been set up

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RO, Plants, Water Quality
The institute undertook a study on the RO plants, which were set up as technology solutions to address quality related problems in drinking water. Pixabay

 National Institute of Rural Development and Panchayati Raj (NIRDPR) has recommended that Reverse Osmosis (RO) plants be set up only in the villages that have water quality problems so as to avoid high costs and maintenance burden.

The institute undertook a study on the RO plants, which were set up as technology solutions to address quality related problems in drinking water.

The study covered 21 gram panchayats (GPs), or village level local bodies, in seven states where the highest number of RO plants had been set up, as per the data provided by the Union Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation.

The study looked at three GPs with RO plants in four southern states, two from west India and one from north India.

RO, Plants, Water Quality
National Institute of Rural Development and Panchayati Raj (NIRDPR) has recommended that Reverse Osmosis (RO) plants be set up only in the villages that have water quality problems. Pixabay

“Our hunch was that possibly, a GP President feels elated to say that he provides RO treated water to his voters, (when in reality the quality of the water is potable). Empirical verification revealed that we were right in every third case,” said Professor P. Sivaram, Head, Centre for Rural Infrastructure, NIRDPR.

Out of the 21 cases studied, eight units have come up at places where they were not required as no quality-related problem in water is observed there. This has several cost implications not only to the state but also to the GPs in terms of maintenance, he added.

In 16 of the 21 GPs, the RO plants are operated by the GP whereas in the other cases, they were found to be operated by private players for profit or by NGOs as part of their rural development programmes.

The study revealed that people were paying Rs 50 to Rs 150 per month depending on the usage. There have been certain unique modes of payment introduced such as swiping the ATM card, coin-operated systems, water coupons, among others, which are easing the burden on the GPs. Yet, challenges continue to persist in their uptake since several families feel the taste of RO-treated water is bland or that it is not affordable and they prefer piped water supply instead.

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In several of the under study states, it was found that the levels of calcium and magnesium fell drastically after the RO treatment, which could potentially cause calcium deficiency in the body.

In rural areas, however, which continue to struggle with contaminated water, the RO reject water can be utilised for other uses such as in school/anganwadi (child care centre) toilets which is being done in some villages in Rajasthan, the report said. (IANS)

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Here are 5 Mistakes that may Kill Your Plants in Winters

Mistakes that kill your plants in winter

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Plants in winters
It is your duty to take care of your plants during winters as some careless mistakes might kill them. Pixabay

As winter approaches, humans go into power-saving mode and do all that it takes to make the cold season as cosy as possible. Considering that plants can’t do so by themselves, we need to take care of them during these few months.

For some plants, winters are a time when they go into hibernation. That means they can slow down their growth or even go completely dormant. The severely cold temperatures can sometimes send them into shock. So we need to give them some extra love and care during these possibly distressing months. Here’s a look at some things that could cause harm to your plants and what you can do to prevent it. Vinayak Garg, Founder of LazyGardener, underlines key points to be kept in mind.

1.Relocation

Now plants that are in the ground, cannot be moved of course, but potted plants should be moved to a place where they will get as much sunlight as possible. In winters, the days slowly become shorter, which means less sun exposure, so if possible move the plants according to the sun, allowing them to soak up as much as they can.

They should also be kept in a location where they don’t get too much of a cold breeze of drafts.

Make sure that the plant’s foliage does not have dew on it, if it does, you can wipe it off. Plants like succulents are sensitive and water deposits on the plant can kill them.

Overwatering winters
Overwatering plants during winters is not a good idea. Lifetime Stock

You can move your outdoor potted plants indoors, next to a window that has the most sun exposure. Also, make sure the window is clean so it allows more sun to shine through as opposed to a dusty one which would make the sunlight diffused. Small things can help the plant withstand the cold temperatures.

2.Water Temperature

Have you ever gotten up on a cold winter morning and walked to your bathroom in a half-asleep state and turned the tap on and jumped up in shock? Yes, sometimes the tap water can get so extremely cold that your hands might start hurting after washing them with the cold water. This extremely cold water can harm your plants as well.

The cold water will force the sensitive roots into shock. A good habit would be to fill up a bucket of water in the morning when you wake up, let it sit and reach at least room temperature and then you can water all your plants.

3.Overwatering

It is very easy to overwater a plant during the winters. It may seem to be counter-intuitive to not water your plants in winter, with the air being very dry, but plants are the most susceptible to root rot during winters. Because of the minimum sun exposure, the evaporation rate also drops down a lot. This causes the water in the pot to accumulate for a longer period of time, giving the roots more opportunity to rot. It might be hard, but avoid watering your plants until the dire need arises, or the soil is dry completely. You should also take care of when you water the plants. Watering in the evening and night may be detrimental to plant because the temperatures drop severely at night and the water that the soil holds will also get very very cold, which will, in turn, harm the sensitive roots of the plant. The best time would be in the late morning when the sun is just beginning to warm the soil.

4. Cleaning the plants

Cleaning winters
Cleaning your plants even during winters is very important. Pixabay

We need to make sure that in winter, the plant is at its optimum capacity to soak up as much sunlight as possible. When dust accumulates on the leaves of the plants, it prevents them from performing photosynthesis as well as they can. Cleaning the surface of the leaves with a soft damp cloth is the best way to get your plants looking pretty and giving them the best chance to take in all the sun that they can!

Cleaning your plants also includes getting rid of any dead leaves or stems. Dead, rotten leaves and stems can cause infections in healthy ones. So it is necessary to get rid of the dead parts promptly.

Any weeds should also be taken out of the pot. Sometimes small vegetation grows in the pot without you even planting anything, but these weeds take up resources from the soil.

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5. Repotting

Repotting of plants should be avoided in winters. Plants are at their dormant phase in winters and repotting can disturb the root system easily, leading plant into a state of shock. Repotting should be resumed in early springs which starts from February. (IANS)