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Using the wrong detergent can lead to babies experiencing skin-related issues. Pixabay

One common dilemma that most parents face is how to ensure that the detergent they use is tough on stains and odour of soiled baby clothes piling up every hour and gentle on their baby’s skin.

Health experts suggest that as a baby’s skin is not the same as an adult’s, using the same detergent can lead to babies experiencing skin-related issues. While the residual substance left behind during laundry might not impact adults, the same can affect a baby’s sensitive skin.


“Choosing a laundry wash that has natural ingredients like neem, soapnut, lemon and geranium can be safe on babies’ skin,” Dr. Subhashini N.S., Discovery Sciences Group, R&D, The Himalaya Drug Company, said in a statement.


Choosing a detergent that has natural ingredients like neem, soapnut, lemon and geranium can be safe on babies’ skin. Pixabay

“These ingredients are known for their antimicrobial properties and are gentle on babies’ clothes. Soapnut further helps clean the fabric and remove stains effectively,” she said.

The detergent that we choose for baby laundry needs to be gentle and help maintain the softness of the fabric. A fresh and mild fragrance post wash would be welcome, without any detergent residue, according to the experts.

Also Read- New Smart Speaker that Tracks Baby’s Breathing Using White Noise

“An important aspect is to ensure that the baby laundry wash is free from harsh chemicals like phosphorous, parabens, synthetic colour, SLS/SLES/ALS (sodium lauryl sulfate/sodium laureth sulfate/ammonium lauryl sulfate), added bleach, silicates, and fluorescent. It’s better to opt for a laundry wash that is clinically tested, gentle on baby’s skin, and does not leave behind any residue,” Subhashini said.

Harsh chemicals can affect a baby’s skin, leading to allergies and rashes. If you notice any signs of irritation, rashes, or allergy on your baby’s skin, do consult a medical professional immediately, she advised. (IANS)


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