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A woman looks at job advertisements on a wall in Qingdao West Coast New Zone in Shandong province, China, Jan. 17, 2019. VOA

According to statistics, the number of self-employed workers in the UK has been consistently on the rise since 2001. Although it may seem like those who work for themselves account for only a small proportion of the workforce, the numbers tell a different story, with around 15 percent of people now acting as their own bosses.

Young people, in particular, are increasingly keen to work for themselves, with the tally of self-employed individuals between 16 and 24 having almost doubled in the past 18 years.


So, why exactly is it that more and more of us are choosing to take the leap and go it alone?

A desire for flexible working hours and greater control

The Office for National Statistics recently published some revealing figures, detailing how the number of self-employed workers in the UK has risen from 3.3 million in 2001 to 4.8 million in 2017 – an admittedly huge leap.

This shows how self-employment has increased rapidly in the space of less than two decades, leaving many to question what it is that’s driving the pattern.

The largest number of self-employed workers are aged between 45 and 54, but rapid increases in the number of individuals working for themselves have also been seen amongst both younger and older demographics, suggesting that this trend has been catalysed by external factors affecting us all.


The ever-growing number of self-employed workers has forced the issue of protection for such individuals into the spotlight in recent months, with many claiming the current framework is not adequate. Pixabay

Indeed, much of this growth came in the wake of the recession, when jobs were more difficult to come by. Many posit that some of these workers, at least initially, had no choice but to work for themselves, as unemployment was their only other alternative.

The rise in self-employment has certainly helped to boost job growth overall, with the unemployment rate in the UK currently at its lowest level since 1975.

Think tanks like the Resolution Foundation also suggest that a desire for flexible working may have had a part to play, particularly for those looking to circumvent the ‘long hours working culture’ that is so prevalent amongst UK businesses.

An overhaul in employment rights imminent

The ever-growing number of self-employed workers has forced the issue of protection for such individuals into the spotlight in recent months, with many claiming the current framework is not adequate.

Whilst there are many boons to working for oneself, in terms of the freedom and flexibility it offers, there are also some major downsides, including a dearth of holiday or sick pay, and significantly lower average earnings, especially for women.

In fact, very few protections exist in general. Self-employed workers are expected to take full responsibility for the successes and failures of their enterprise and the scope of their earnings. Their responsibilities extend to, for example, taking out appropriate cover, no matter how niche, with insurance providers having to step into the breach the government leaves open.


Tell us, with all of this in mind, would you ever consider going solo, or is the certainty of standard employment better suited to your long-term goals? Pixabay

This means, for instance, that handyman liability insurance, which protects the long-term future of business operations in this industry, is left to offer essential and much-needed protection to those working within the sphere on a self-employed basis.

Also Read- Here’s How Quitting Facebook Can Change Your Life

This has led to government proposals to thoroughly overhaul employment rights, though it is not yet clear how far such changes might go in providing blanket protection, compared to protection which is focused only on certain groups, such as those working in the gig economy.

Tell us, with all of this in mind, would you ever consider going solo, or is the certainty of standard employment better suited to your long-term goals?


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"Malgudi is where we all belong, and where we wish we lived."

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R. K. Narayan, one of the most well-known and popular writers within India and outside India is the creator of this town and the occurrences of this town. The stories follow the characters Swami and his friends through their everyday lives. Be it the story of fake astrologers who scam and loot the people by his cleverness, or the story of a blind beggar and his dog where the money blinded the man with greed; each story has a lesson to learn, morals and values hidden in it. As the stories are simple, easy to understand yet heart-touching it makes it easy for the kids to connect with each character and imagine the story as if the reader themselves were the protagonist of the story. In simple words, we can say that R.K. Narayan simply told stories of ordinary people trying to live their simple lives in a changing world.

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Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourised in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated

The Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) has directed Pak TV channels to stop airing what it calls indecency and intimacy in dramas, Samaa TV reported.

A notification issued by the authority states that it has been receiving numerous complaints from viewers who believe that the content being depicted in dramas does not represent the "true picture of Pakistani society".

"PEMRA finally got something right: Intimacy and affection between married couples isn't 'true depiction of Pakistani society and must not be 'glamourized'. Our 'culture' is control, abuse, and violence, which we must jealously guard against the imposition of such alien values," said Reema Omer, Legal Advisor, South Asia, International Commission of Jurists.

"Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourized in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated, as per the report.

The authority added that it has directed channels time and again to review content with "indecent dressing, controversial and objectionable plots, bed scenes and unnecessary detailing of events".

Most complaints received by the PEMRA Call Centre during September concern drama serial "Juda Huay Kuch is Tarah", which created quite a storm on social media for showing an unwitting married couple as foster siblings in a teaser for an upcoming episode. However, it only turned out to be a family scheme after the full episode aired, but by that time criticism had mounted on HUM TV for using the themes of incest to drive the plot, the report said. (IANS/JB)

Keywords: Pakistan, Islam, Serials, Dramas, Culture, Teachings.