Friday November 16, 2018

Rising Temperatures on Global Level May Spike Up Number of Deaths Due to Heat

It also urges countries to make additional efforts to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius

0
//
Global Warming has led to rapid rise in temperature in India. VOA
Republish
Reprint

Countries need to keep global temperatures in check by meeting the goals set out in the Paris Agreement, or more people could die because of extreme temperatures, researchers have warned.

The Paris Agreement, adopted in 2015 under the auspices of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), binds nations to hold warming well below 2 degrees Celsius in global mean temperature, relative to pre-industrial levels.

It also urges countries to make additional efforts to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

The study by researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) indicated dramatic increases of heat-related deaths under extreme warming (3 degrees Celsius and 4 degrees Celsius) compared to the mildest threshold (1.5 degrees Celsius), with additional excess mortality ranging from over 0.73 per cent to nearly 9 per cent across all regions.

“Our projections suggest that large increases in temperature-related deaths could be limited in most regions if warming was kept below 2 degrees Celsius,” said lead author Ana Maria Vicedo-Cabrera from the varsity.

The net difference remained positive and high in most of the areas, even when potential decreases in cold-related deaths were considered.

Temperatures
NASA Map showing 2016 temperatures around the globe. VOA

However, net increase in deaths was still projected for warmer regions such as South America, South Europe, and South-East Asia (with changes ranging from more than 0.19 per cent to nearly one per cent), while in cooler regions the excess mortality was predicted to stay stable or drop slightly.

“Under extreme changes in climate, large parts of the world could experience a dramatic increase in excess mortality due to heat. This would not be balanced by decreases in cold-related deaths,” Vicedo-Cabrera added.

The results, appearing in the journal Climatic Change, is based on historical data on temperature-related deaths from 451 locations in 23 countries with different socio-economic and climatic conditions.

Also Read About Latest Investment Made by Google- Google to Invest Around $140mn to Expand its Data Center in Chile

Currently, we are on a trajectory to reach over 3 degrees Celsius of warming, and if this trend continues there would be serious consequences for health in many parts of the world, the researchers noted.

“Efforts to limit the increase in global temperatures to below 1.5 degrees Celsius could provide additional benefits in tropical or arid regions, including the most populous and often poorest countries,” Vicedo-Cabrera said. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Chocolate may disappear in a few years due to global temperatures

Experts have warned that increase in warmer global temperatures and dryer weather conditions could see chocolate disappear by as early as 2050.

0
Chocolate may disappear in few years due to global temperatures
Chocolate may disappear in few years due to global temperatures. Wikimedia

London, Jan 2, 2018: With warmer global temperatures and dryer weather conditions threatening the survival of the fragile cocoa plant, which could see chocolate disappear by as early as 2050, scientists are exploring the possibility of using the gene-editing technology CRISPR to evolve crops that can survive environmental challenges.

Scientists from the University of California are teaming up with food and candy company Mars to explore CRISPR technique to help tiny cocao seedlings to survive and thrive in the dryer, warmer climate, Businessinsider.com reported.

Experts have warned that increase in warmer global temperatures and dryer weather conditions could see chocolate disappear by as early as 2050.

Chocolates may get disappeared by 2050.
Chocolates may get disappeared by 2050. VOA

The cacao tree — which produces cocoa beans — can only grow within a narrow strip of rain forested land roughly 20 degrees north and south of the Equator, where temperature, rain, and humidity all stay relatively constant throughout the year.

However, the fragile plant is under threat from diseases and a changing climate that will suck moisture from the soil and make it impossible to produce a good crop in many regions around the world by 2050, the Sun reported.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, by 2050 the rising temperatures will push the chocolate-growing regions of the world more than 1,000 feet uphill into mountainous terrain — much of which is currently preserved for wildlife.

The problem is most cocoa is produced by poor families who cannot afford fertilisers and pesticides, the experts noted.

“More than 90 per cent of the global cocoa crop is produced by smallholders on subsistence farms with unimproved planting material,” Doug Hawkins, of Hardman Agribusiness — a London based capital markets advisory services firm — was quoted as saying to the Sun.

“All the indicators are that we could be looking at a chocolate deficit of 100,000 tons a year in the next few years,” Hawkins added. (IANS)