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Ross Ulbricht, creator of Silk Road website, sentenced to life in prison

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Ross Ulbricht, the convicted mastermind behind the infamous Silk Road website, has been sentenced to life in prison by a Manhattan judge.

Silk Road was an online black market where users could anonymously buy drugs, weapons and other illegal goods.

In addition to his prison sentence, Ulbricht has been ordered to pay a massive restitution of more than $183 million.

“The stated purpose [of the Silk Road] was to be beyond the law. In the world you created over time, democracy didn’t exist. You were captain of the ship, the Dread Pirate Roberts,” Judge Katherine Forrest told Ulbricht as reported by Wired.

“Silk Road’s birth and presence asserted that its…creator was better than the laws of this country. This is deeply troubling, terribly misguided, and very dangerous.”

The defence claimed that Ulbricht started Silk Road as an economic experiment, but handed it off to others after a few months. However he was lured back to the site to be set up as a fall guy when prosecutors were closing in.

Vice News reported that Ulbricht’s family is planning to appeal the sentencing.

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Research Reveals, Cancer Patients Are More Likely To Use Marijuana

"Medical marijuana legislation has previously been associated with reduction in hospitalisations related to opioid dependence or abuse, suggesting if patients are in fact substituting marijuana for opioid, this may introduce an opportunity for reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality,"

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The researchers found significantly increased use of marijuana over time -- likely reflecting increased availability due to legislative changes -- but they found stable rates of opioid use. Pixabay

Many cancer patients use marijuana and its usage has increased, a new study suggests. The findings, published in the journal CANCER, indicate 40.3 per cent cancer patients used marijuana within the past year, compared with 38 per cent of respondents without cancer.

“Prospective clinical trials are needed to quantify the efficacy of marijuana in cancer-specific pain as well as the risk of opioid misuse in this patient population,” said co-author Kathryn Ries Tringale from the University of California, San Diego.

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They found patients with cancer were more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer — 13.9 per cent versus 6.4 per cent. Pixabay

For the study, 826 people with cancer were matched to 1,652 controls.

The researchers found significantly increased use of marijuana over time — likely reflecting increased availability due to legislative changes — but they found stable rates of opioid use.

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“Prospective clinical trials are needed to quantify the efficacy of marijuana in cancer-specific pain as well as the risk of opioid misuse in this patient population,” said co-author Kathryn Ries Tringale from the University of California, San Diego. VOA

They found patients with cancer were more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer — 13.9 per cent versus 6.4 per cent.

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“Medical marijuana legislation has previously been associated with reduction in hospitalisations related to opioid dependence or abuse, suggesting if patients are in fact substituting marijuana for opioid, this may introduce an opportunity for reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality,” said lead author Jona Hattangadi-Gluth from the varsity. (IANS)