Saturday August 18, 2018
Home World Will your kid...

Will your kids get enough water? Global demand of water to surpass supply by 2050

0
//
129
Republish
Reprint

tap-357252_640

By Newsgram Staff Writer

If we keep wasting water at the current rate, there will be a severe shortage of water by 2050, a study has suggested.

According to a research by  Anthony Parolari from Duke University, the global demand of water will  surpass the supply if the population keeps burgeoning in the current manner by 2050. The water levels are diminishing and the consumption trend is a worrying site.

“But if population growth trends continue, per-capita water use will have to decline even more sharply for there to be enough water to meet demand,” said researcher Anthony Parolari from Duke University.

The researchers used what is called a delayed-feedback mathematical model to analyze historic data to help project future trends.

“The world population is projected to escalate up to 96 billion till 2050. What strains us is how would we comply to the growing needs of every new born? How much more water can we supply? We might be reaching an alarming state where the efficiency measures are no longer sufficient and water scarcity either impacts population growth or pushes us to find new water supplies,” researches said.

“For every new person who is born, how much more water can we supply? The model suggests we may reach a tipping point where efficiency measures are no longer sufficient and water scarcity either impacts population growth or pushes us to find new water supplies,” Parolari noted.

Water recycling, and finding new and better ways to remove salt from seawater, are among the more likely technological advances that could help alleviate or avoid future water shortages.

 

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

NASA Invented A Tool To Predict Floods Due To Ice Melt

It looks at the Earth's spin and gravitational effects to predict water "redistribution"

0
NASA
NASA solar probe launch delayed. Pixabay

NASA scientists have developed a tool to forecast which cities are vulnerbale to flooding due to melting of ice in a warming climate.

It looks at the Earth’s spin and gravitational effects to predict how water will be “redistributed” globally, BBC reported.

“This provides, for each city, a picture of which glaciers, ice sheets, (and) ice caps are of specific importance,” the researchers were quoted as saying.

The research, detailed in the journal Science Advances, could provide scientists a way to determine which ice sheets they should be “most worried about”.

The researchers explained that as land ice is lost to the oceans, both the Earth’s gravitational and rotational potentials are perturbed, resulting in strong spatial patterns in sea-level rise (SLR). The pattern of sea-level change has been termed sea-level fingerprints.

“We lack robust forecasting models for future ice changes, which diminishes our ability to use these fingerprints to accurately predict local sea-level (LSL) changes,” the researchers said.

So they set out to determine the exact gradient of sea-level fingerprints with respect to local variations in the ice thickness of all of the world’s ice drainage systems.

NASA
NASA, Flickr

“By exhaustively mapping these fingerprint gradients, we form a new diagnosis tool, henceforth referred to as gradient fingerprint mapping (GFM), that readily allows for improved assessments of future coastal inundation or emergence,” the study said.

The researchers demonstrated that for Antarctica and Greenland, changes in the predictions of inundation at major port cities depend on the location of the drainage system.

For example, in London, local sea-level changes is significantly affected by changes on the western part of the Greenland ice sheet, whereas in New York, such changes are greatly sensitive to changes in the northeastern portions of the ice sheet, the tool showed. (IANS)

Next Story