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Russia Helped Trump To Win On Every Social Media Platform: Senate Report

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is investigating whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to influence the 2016 election

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Former Donald Trump presidential campaign adviser George Papadopoulos, center, who triggered the Russia investigation, leaves federal court with wife Simona Mangiante, on Sept. 7, 2018, in Washington. VOA

Russia used every major social media platform to target voters with misinformation to try to get Donald Trump elected president, according to a new report that was prepared for the U.S. Senate and seen by The Washington Post.

The report says Russians working for a group called The Internet Research Agency (IRA) began experimenting with social media to influence local elections in 2009 and expanded its operations to U.S. elections in 2013 using Twitter.

It gradually added other popular social media sites to its campaign, including YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram.

For the 2016 presidential campaign, the report says Russians attempted to stir up conservative voters to back Trump by stressing such issues as gun rights and immigration.

Facebook, Trump
Conference workers speak in front of a demo booth at Facebook’s annual F8 developer conference, in San Jose, California, April 18, 2017. VOA

At the same time, the Russian operatives sent black voters messages and other information aimed at confusing them about the electoral process, including misleading information on how to vote.

Other groups, such as liberals, women, Muslims, Latinos, and veterans, were also targeted with similar messages either appealing to their politics or trying to discourage them from voting.

“What is clear is that all of the messaging clearly sought to benefit the Republican Party and specifically Donald Trump,” the report says according to The Washington Post.

The newspaper says the report criticizes technology companies for what it calls their “belated and uncoordinated response” when the misinformation campaign was discovered and their delay in sharing information with investigators.

Michael Cohen, Trump
Michael Cohen walks out of federal court, Nov. 29, 2018, in New York, after pleading guilty to lying to Congress about work he did on an aborted project to build a Trump Tower in Russia. VOA

The report also warns that social media is morphing from what it says are tools for “sharing collective grievances and coordinating civic engagement,” including in the Middle East, to threats to democracy from “canny political consultants” and “politicians in democracies and dictatorships alike.”

The Post says Facebook and Google have not commented on the report. But Twitter says it has made “significant strides since the 2016 election to harden its digital defenses.”

The United States has already leveled criminal charges against Russia’s Internet Research Agency for interfering in the 2016 campaign.

Also Read: U.S. President Not Worried About Impeachment, Defends Hush Payments

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is investigating whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to influence the 2016 election and whether the president has tried to obstruct justice by trying to undermine the probe.

Trump denies there was any collusion and calls the Mueller probe a “witch hunt.” (VOA)

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Russia Launched First Humanoid Robot Astronaut into the ISS

Russia launches humanoid robot into space

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The humanoid robot will be brought inside the ISS for five days of engineering tests. Pixabay

Russia launched its first humanoid robot astronaut into the International Space Station (ISS) on Thursday.

The launch took place from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 3.38 a.m. (local time), said the Mission Control Centre of the Russian Federal Space Agency. It will reach the station on Saturday.

The robot — named Fedor (Experimental Demonstration Object Research) — is the first ever sent into space by Russia. It is the only commander and crewman onboard the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft. The humanoid robot is 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs 160 kg.

During its 10 days at the ISS, Fedor will learn new skills such as “connecting and disconnecting electric cables, using standard items from a screwdriver and a spanner to a fire extinguisher,” said Alexander Bloshenko, the Russian space agency’s Director for prospective programmes and science.

humanoid robot
The humanoid robot is 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighs 160 kg. Pixabay

The humanoid robot will be brought inside the ISS for five days of engineering tests. It is expected to return to the Earth on September 6.

Also Read: Nokia Smartphones to Bring Android 10

It is hoped that Fedor will eventually carry out more dangerous tasks such as spacewalks, the BBC reported. Fedor is not the first robot sent into space.

The US sent a robot into space in 2011 with the aim of working in high-risk environments. It was flown back to the Earth in 2018 after suffered technical problems. Japan also sent a robot to the ISS in 2013. (IANS)