Friday December 6, 2019
Home Lead Story Russian Hacke...

Russian Hackers Can Target 2020 Olympics, Warns Microsoft

The IT major has also recommended that firms should enable a two-factor authentication, learn the warning signs of a phishing attack and enable security alerts about links and files from suspicious websites

0
//
FILE - Microsoft Corp. signage is shown outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash.
FILE - Microsoft Corp. signage is shown outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. VOA

Microsoft claimed that it has recently detected Russian hackers are trying to disrupt the 2020 Tokyo Olympics by infiltrating sporting and anti-doping agencies.

The hacking group called Fancy Bear, APT28, or Strontium could impact the 2020 Summer Olympic Games, the tech giant has warned.

Analysts at Microsoft Threat Intelligence Centre also published details of the hacks, which began on September 16 and have so far targeted at least 16 sporting and anti-doping agencies since inception.

“At least 16 national and international sporting and anti-doping organisations across three continents were targeted in these attacks,” Microsoft wrote in a blog post, while providing details of the activity.

microsoft, xbox
FILE – A sign for Microsoft is seen on a building in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 18, 2017. VOA

“The methods used in the attacks are similar to those routinely used by (Fancy Bear) to target governments, militaries, think tanks, law firms, human rights organisations, financial firms and universities around the world,” the company added.

Also Read: Social Networking Giant Facebook Sues Domain Hosts Over Cyber-squatting

Meanwhile, the tech giant has notified all the organisations that were targeted.

The IT major has also recommended that firms should enable a two-factor authentication, learn the warning signs of a phishing attack and enable security alerts about links and files from suspicious websites. (IANS)

Next Story

Infosys Brings Microsoft-powered Security Solution ‘Cyber Next’

Cyber Next's services include round the clock monitoring and lifecycle management, among others through an internationally scattered network of cyber defence centres, experts and skilled security analysts

0
Infosys
Office building of Infosys. Pixabay

Global software major Infosys on Tuesday launched Cyber Next, a Microsoft Azure Sentinel-powered platform offering enhanced enterprise security management services solutions.

“We are developing next-generation platform-based offerings that leverage Azure Sentinel to help customers simplify their security operations, and scale as they grow,” Infosys cybersecurity practice head Vishal Salvi said in a statement.

Salvi said Microsoft Azure Sentinel’s core features match with the Bengaluru-based $11 billion company’s philosophy of diagnose, design, deliver and defend users from security threats.

Microsoft Azure Sentinel is a threat averting solution for enterprises, combining the American software giant’s decades long security experience with artificial intelligence and cloud.

FILE - Microsoft Corp. signage is shown outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash.
FILE – Microsoft Corp. signage is shown outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. VOA

With features such as Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) and Security Orchestration Automation and Response (SOAR), the Microsoft solution enables enterprises to address data threats formidably.

Also Read: Here’s How Cannabis Can Help You Reduce Migraine Pain by Nearly Half

“We have a responsibility to bring new cybersecurity capabilities to our customers. By combining the strengths of the Microsoft security portfolio with Infosys service offerings, enterprises are able to better manage their security posture,” said Microsoft cybersecurity solutions group corporate vice president Ann Johnson.

Cyber Next’s services include round the clock monitoring and lifecycle management, among others through an internationally scattered network of cyber defence centres, experts and skilled security analysts. (IANS)