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Russian Hackers Targeting European Embassies: Report

Check Point Research has pointed out several other similar attack campaigns, including some targeting Russian-speaking victims as well

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Hackers threaten to reveal 'secret' data linked to 9/11 attacks. Wikimedia Commons

Russian cyber attackers recently targeted a number of embassies in Europe by employing a weaponised version of TeamViewer — a popular remote access service and malware disguised as a top secret US government document, according to media reports.

“They typically emailed the officials Microsoft Excel sheets with malicious macros that appeared to have originated from the United States State Department. Once opened, the hackers were able to gain full control of the infected computer by weaponising the installed TeamViewer software,” The Verge reported late on Monday.

The hackers attacked European embassies in Kenya, Italy, Liberia, Nepal, Guyana, Bermuda and Lebanon, among others.

“While Russian in origin, it’s unlikely that these attacks were state-sponsored. One perpetrator was traced back to a hacking and carding forum and registered under the same username, ‘EvaPiks’ on both.

“‘EvaPiks’ posted instructions on how to carry out this kind of cyber attack on forums and advised other users as well,” the report added.

Check Point Research has pointed out several other similar attack campaigns, including some targeting Russian-speaking victims as well.

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Due to the attackers’ background in the illegal carding community, Check Point suggested that they could have been “financially motivated”, the report suggested. (IANS)

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Thousands Of Disney+ Accounts Hacked And Up For Sale On Dark Web

Hackers have hijacked thousands of Disney+ accounts and put them up for sale on the Dark Web

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Hacked Disney+ accounts
Hackers have hijacked thousands of Disney+ accounts. Pixabay

As Disney garnered over 10 million subscribers for its online streaming service Disney+ on its first day of operation, reports have surfaced on Monday that hackers have already hijacked thousands of accounts and put them up for sale on the Dark Web.

ZDNet discovered several listings for Disney+ accounts on different underground hacking forums, selling for somewhere between $3 and $5.

The Disney+ launch was marred by technical issues and users reported being unable to stream their favourite movies and shows.

Several users reported losing access to their accounts.

“Many users reported that hackers were accessing their accounts, logging them out of all devices, and then changing the account’s email and password, effectively taking over the account and locking the previous owner out,” said the report on.

Disney was yet to comment.

In some cases, hackers gained access to accounts by using email and password combos leaked at other sites, while in other cases “the Disney+ credentials might have been obtained from users infected with keylogging or info-stealing malware”.

Researchers asked Disney+ to help users by rolling out support for multi-factor authentication and prevent more attacks.

Disney+ accounts sold on dark web
The hijacked Disney+ accounts are up for sale on dark web. Pixabay

On the very first day of release on November 12, Disney+ users collectively spent 1.3 million hours streaming and watching the content available to them on the platform for the first day of release.

As per reports, analysts projected that Disney+ would have anywhere between 10-18 million subscribers in its first year. Disney has signed up more than half of those projected numbers in 24 hours.

The service was launched in the US for $6.99 per month or $69 per year.

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The company has announced the service will be launched in major European markets, including the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and “a number of other countries in the region” on March 31 next year.

Earlier, Disney had said that it expected to spend about $1 billion in 2020 on original content for the platform and $2 billion by 2024. (IANS)