Tuesday February 25, 2020
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Now Russian Telecom Watchdog To Direct Facebook, Twitter to Localise Users’ Database

Last year, Roskomnadzor attempted to block instant messaging app Telegram in Russia due to its refusal to provide user data, but failed for technical reasons

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Facebook, photos
This photograph taken on May 16, 2018, shows a figurine standing in front of the logo of social network Facebook on a cracked screen of a smartphone in Paris. VOA

Russian telecom watchdog Roskomnadzor has said that it will punish Twitter and Facebook if they decline to move the database of Russian users to Russia.

“The companies will either have to localise the databases within a certain period of time, which I suppose will be about nine months, or they will be punished,” Roskomnadzor head Alexander Zharov was quoted as saying by Xinhua news agency on Tuesday.

He expects Twitter and Facebook representatives to meet with Roskomnadzor officials in Moscow by the end of February to discuss the issue.

Russian legislation requires Internet service providers to store and process personal data of Russians on the territory of Russia.

Twitter, India, Smartphone
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

Roskomnadzor has the right to impose fines on or even block Internet companies for their violations.

In December, it fined Google 500,000 rubles (around USD 7,625) for failing to remove search links to banned information.

Also Read- Online Food Ordering and Delivery App Swiggy Widens its Scope by Launching Stores

Last year, Roskomnadzor attempted to block instant messaging app Telegram in Russia due to its refusal to provide user data, but failed for technical reasons. (IANS)

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About 25% Tweets Regarding Climate Change are Produced by Bots, Reveals Study

The study could not identify the people responsible for setting up the bots that were trained to post climate denial messages on Twitter

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Twitter
The researchers found that only five per cent of tweets advocating action to protect the environment were produced by bots. Pixabay

A lot of messages denying the effects of global warming might actually have been written by bots as new research from Brown University in the US found that about 25 per cent of the tweets about climate change that they analysed were produced by automated accounts.

Bots are non-personal or automated accounts that post content to social media platforms.

While the findings of the study are yet to be published, The Guardian newspaper reported them after seeing the draft study.

The results suggest that online conversations about climate change are often distorted due to the activities of the bots.

According to a report in the BBC on Saturday, the research team at Brown University analysed 6.5 million tweets from around the time US President Donald Trump revealed his intention to remove the US from the Paris climate accord in 2017.

The analysis showed a quarter of tweets on climate change were likely posted by bots.

“These findings suggest a substantial impact of mechanized bots in amplifying denials messages about climate change, including support for Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris agreement,” stated the draft study, according to The Guardian.

twitter
A lot of messages denying the effects of global warming might actually have been written by bots as new research from Brown University in the US found that about 25 per cent of the tweets about climate change that they analysed were produced by automated accounts. Pixabay

The study could not identify the people responsible for setting up the bots that were trained to post climate denial messages on Twitter.

For the study, the researchers used a tool from Indiana University called Botometer, which uses an algorithm to assign a score to Twitter accounts based upon the likelihood they are automated.

ALSO READ: Google Indexes Invite Links To Private Group Chat on WhatsApp With a Simple Search

The researchers found that only five per cent of tweets advocating action to protect the environment were produced by bots. (IANS)